Housing hornets' nest



  • Tony Alexander has stirred up a hornets' nest by effectively writing that Gen X/Y's who want to own their own house need to harden up, stop drinking lattes and spend their weekends with a hammer in their hand.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/90006090/dont-blame-the-boomers-for-high-house-prices

    Today, the BNZ CEO has largely apologized for the comments - "his more inflammatory remarks".

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/90090644/learn-from-boomers-comments-spark-apology

    I wouldn't usually refer anyone to the Stuff comments section, since usually you'll end up stupider for reading the comments, but there's lots of quite fascinating ones and an evident divide between the wealthy home owning baby boomers and some pretty bitter Gen X/Y kids.

    As a member of the former group, I reckon it would be pretty interesting to stick one of the latter group in a time machine to go back and find how good we had it in the 1960s, 70s, 80s. I suspect they wouldn't like it that much.



  • @Chris-B. said in Housing hornets' nest:

    Tony Alexander has stirred up a hornets' nest by effectively writing that Gen X/Y's who want to own their own house need to harden up, stop drinking lattes and spend their weekends with a hammer in their hand.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/90006090/dont-blame-the-boomers-for-high-house-prices

    Today, the BNZ CEO has largely apologized for the comments - "his more inflammatory remarks".

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/90090644/learn-from-boomers-comments-spark-apology

    I wouldn't usually refer anyone to the Stuff comments section, since usually you'll end up stupider for reading the comments, but there's lots of quite fascinating ones and an evident divide between the wealthy home owning baby boomers and some pretty bitter Gen X/Y kids.

    As a member of the former group, I reckon it would be pretty interesting to stick one of the latter group in a time machine to go back and find how good we had it in the 1960s, 70s, 80s. I suspect they wouldn't like it that much.

    Boomers had cheaper houses, better house to income ratio but then the interest rates were in the mid to high 20's.
    Every generation likes to bitch about the previous one, or the current one.
    The music is too loud, it sounds shit why do they swear so much?



  • I thought David Seymour's comment about having to give up 26 lattes a day to match the rise in house prices last year was quite apt...

    I don't think the generational blame game does much though. About as much use as careers and workplace generalisations based on people falling into three or four generational categories... at least horoscopes have 12 bullshit categories to divide millions of people up into...



  • reminds me of this article that resurfaces now and again (repeated in this article by a Kaikohe Princial)

    Always we hear the cry from teenagers, 'What can we do, where can we go?'
    My answer is this: Go home, mow the lawn, wash the windows, learn to cook, build a raft, get a job, visit the sick, study your lessons, and after you've finished, read a book.
    Your town does not owe you recreational facilities and your parents do not owe you fun.
    The world does not owe you a living, you owe the world something.
    You owe it your time, energy and talent so that no one will be at war, in poverty or sick and lonely again.
    In other words, grow up, stop being a cry baby, get out of your dream world and develop a backbone, not a wishbone.
    Start behaving like a responsible person.
    You are important and you are needed.
    It's too late to sit around and wait for somebody to do something someday.
    Someday is now and that somebody is you.

    Was written almost 60 years ago...current elderly always look at the younger generation yearning for the old days....I don't expect I will say anything like this to my kids.



  • @Virgil said in Housing hornets' nest:

    Boomers had cheaper houses, better house to income ratio but then the interest rates were in the mid to high 20's.
    Every generation likes to bitch about the previous one, or the current one.
    The music is too loud, it sounds shit why do they swear so much?

    Boomers is just about two generations rolled into one - some of the early Boomers would have bought houses before some of the late Boomers were even born, so there's a pretty wide range of housing market conditions experienced.

    Lots of distortions that would really have to be built into the equation to make things properly comparable, including relative tax rates, the relative costs of other goods and services, proportion of single vs double income families (including that, aside from social norms, appliances were so shit that it was harder for women to go out to work in the old days).

    I distinctly remember that cars were fucking expensive (and old). Took me three years to save for my first car - a seven year old high mileage Datsun 180B.



  • White goods and tvs, electrics etc. were also bloody expensive weren't they?

    The shut up and ditch the latte arguments seem to be quite prominent at the moment. Was watching Sky the other days and one bloke was asking how gen Y could bitch about house prices while stuffing their faces with 20 buck smashed avocado.



  • the old "stop eating at cafes so you can save for a house" argument probably looks pretty fucking unbelievable when it costs you $800K to buy a house, and the bank will only lend you 80% of that. $160K is a fuck load of lattes and smashed avo on toast. Especially given the rental market.



  • @mariner4life said in Housing hornets' nest:

    the old "stop eating at cafes so you can save for a house" argument probably looks pretty fucking unbelievable when it costs you $800K to buy a house, and the bank will only lend you 80% of that. $160K is a fuck load of lattes and smashed avo on toast. Especially given the rental market.

    Chuck in sky with the works. 2 iPhones, a family holiday to the Gold Coast every couple years.
    Doesn't cover everyone but I'm certain there's couples/families out there that would have a chance if they could show some financial sense and live beyond their means



  • @Virgil said in Housing hornets' nest:

    @mariner4life said in Housing hornets' nest:

    the old "stop eating at cafes so you can save for a house" argument probably looks pretty fucking unbelievable when it costs you $800K to buy a house, and the bank will only lend you 80% of that. $160K is a fuck load of lattes and smashed avo on toast. Especially given the rental market.

    Chuck in sky with the works. 2 iPhones, a family holiday to the Gold Coast every couple years. months
    Doesn't cover everyone but I'm certain there's couples/families out there that would have a chance if they could show some financial sense and live beyond their means

    Fixed it. I'm not saying that people should hold back on what they spend if they don't want to, but he is right to say that comparing to previous generations isn't right. Can you imagine 20% plus interest rates!!



  • @Virgil indeed. However these arguments very rarely focus on those who could find a way, but rather paint every aspiring property purchaser with the same brush, circumstances be damned.

    You can't blame the baby boomers for $1M 3-bedroom cottages half an hour from the CBD, and not every aspiring home-owner can't get a deposit together because they want to keep living "the life" (and i wouldn't call all of those things you list as outrageous expenditure either).

    The missus and I are currently saving a heap to pay for our new house (fucking build costs go up every time you turn around) because we couldn't sell our old one for enough. We're on decent money, and sticking away a lot, but even then, it would take years to save a 20% deposit at our current rate. That's got to be disheartening for some people, especially given the whole time they are saving, prices keep going up at huge rates.



  • @Rancid-Schnitzel Yeah - for a lot of the time imported electrical goods had huge tariffs on them - and lots of them were pretty shit, to boot!

    I've got an old ChCh Press newspaper from 1970 that I just dug out to have a look at some relativities.

    The Ashburton Power Board was advertising for a registered electrician who they were going to pay $3450 p.a. (presumably gross) so that guy would have taken home $45-50 per week. A typist's job was advertised at $1100-2350 depending on experience.

    You could buy a two bedroom flat in Papanui for $12,000 or a 4 bedroom house in Fendalton for $26,000.

    A 1962 Vanguard would set you back $1150. You could get a Hoover Super Constellation Vacuum Cleaner for $65, a Zip Thermaglo radiant heater for $34, and an average Atlas range for about $180. A tin of apricot halves were on special at 23c.



  • I always wonder how people know who amongst their fellow cafe dwellers guzzling lattes and eating smashed avos by the boxful are the ones who are or aren't saving for a home deposit.

    Or whether it's the first time they've been in a cafe in months...

    I can remember plenty of people buying teles last time unemployment peaked in 2009 and we were running regional job summits too... but they weren't necessarily one and the same people...

    20% interest rates and bread costing tuppeny ha'penny make for wonderful nostalgic rants for fossils on talkback radio... but a comparison to when 12- 15 years ago you could get a reasonable 3 bedroom house in the Tron for 150 - 170k at 6% interest rates might be another comparison for the much-maligned 'youth of today'.



  • Some people need to drop their expectations for their first house.
    It doesnt need to have 4 bedrooms and be 20 mins from the CBD.
    Its your first house afterall, not your 2nd.

    We live in Helensville, onto our 2nd home in 7 years. Our first only cost $235k in 2009.
    You can still find tidy 3 bed homes for around $500k. Its only 40 mins from downtown Auckland, 30 mins from Westgate or Albany.
    But no its not trendy enough for the current hip young generation.



  • @Virgil said in Housing hornets' nest:

    Some people need to drop their expectations for their first house.
    It doesnt need to have 4 bedrooms and be 20 mins from the CBD.
    Its your first house afterall, not your 2nd.

    We live in Helensville, onto our 2nd home in 7 years. Our first only cost $235k in 2009.
    You can still find tidy 3 bed homes for around $500k. Its only 40 mins from downtown Auckland, 30 mins from Westgate or Albany.
    But no its not trendy enough for the current hip young generation.

    That first home that you paid $235k for in 2009... is it still anywhere near that price vicinity now?

    I wonder how many of us would get into our same first homes now - with current house prices and current salaries. I'm not sure that we would have anywhere near as quickly... and I am thinking a fairly basic 90sqm house there before @Virgil starts muttering about the feckless Gen Y from the vantage point of his mobility scooter πŸ™‚



  • @Virgil i call bullshit on that last line, that seems as easy to say as "too much smashed avo".

    You are right on part though, your first house should be a step down on what you actually want. But it is sometimes a massive call to save for that, spend what is still a lot of money, and then sign yourself up for 6.5 hours in the car a week. And that's just to get to work, let alone to see your friends on the weekend, play for your sports club... Change jobs, make new friends, get a new club. Those are big life decisions that moving that far afield may well require.

    People are very big on telling other people what they need to do, especially if they don't need to do it themselves (that's not directed at you Virgil, but at these arguments in their entirety)



  • @Donsteppa said in Housing hornets' nest:

    @Virgil said in Housing hornets' nest:

    Some people need to drop their expectations for their first house.
    It doesnt need to have 4 bedrooms and be 20 mins from the CBD.
    Its your first house afterall, not your 2nd.

    We live in Helensville, onto our 2nd home in 7 years. Our first only cost $235k in 2009.
    You can still find tidy 3 bed homes for around $500k. Its only 40 mins from downtown Auckland, 30 mins from Westgate or Albany.
    But no its not trendy enough for the current hip young generation.

    That first home that you paid $235k for in 2009... is it still anywhere near that price vicinity now?

    I wonder how many of us would get into our same first homes now - with current house prices and current salaries. I'm not sure that we would have anywhere near as quickly... and I am thinking a fairly basic 90sqm house there before @Virgil starts muttering about the feckless Gen Y from the vantage point of his mobility scooter πŸ™‚

    Sold it 2 years ago for $425k
    It's going to here but the prices are noting compared to the rest of Auckland.
    You don't need to spend $800 - $900k and more for a home.



  • @Donsteppa i could, but only because the prices here stagnated just after i purchased (fucking GFC fucked Cairns). I sold it last year but only made about $25k (despite doing a heap of work around it).

    That said, when we bought it, i was able to borrow 95%, and the first home owners grant was the bulk of my deposit. The banks changed their policies not long after that.



  • @Donsteppa said in Housing hornets' nest:

    @Virgil said in Housing hornets' nest:

    Some people need to drop their expectations for their first house.
    It doesnt need to have 4 bedrooms and be 20 mins from the CBD.
    Its your first house afterall, not your 2nd.

    We live in Helensville, onto our 2nd home in 7 years. Our first only cost $235k in 2009.
    You can still find tidy 3 bed homes for around $500k. Its only 40 mins from downtown Auckland, 30 mins from Westgate or Albany.
    But no its not trendy enough for the current hip young generation.

    That first home that you paid $235k for in 2009... is it still anywhere near that price vicinity now?

    I wonder how many of us would get into our same first homes now - with current house prices and current salaries. I'm not sure that we would have anywhere near as quickly... and I am thinking a fairly basic 90sqm house there before @Virgil starts muttering about the feckless Gen Y from the vantage point of his mobility scooter πŸ™‚

    I'm not sure whether I could get back into it now but I felt sorry for the poor bastard that bought it off me. I sold it in December 2007 he tried to sell it in 2009 for what
    he paid me after he recarpeted the place and put in a new kitchen. Ouch.

    Took me me two years of working every weekend and through Xmas to come up with the deposit and I wouldn't recommend that to anyone.



  • @mariner4life said in Housing hornets' nest:

    the old "stop eating at cafes so you can save for a house" argument probably looks pretty fucking unbelievable when it costs you $800K to buy a house, and the bank will only lend you 80% of that. $160K is a fuck load of lattes and smashed avo on toast. Especially given the rental market.

    Do you go the smashed avocado before or after the dildo?



  • Did anyone see the Nigel Latta show on money recently? Was pretty interesting, talked about how human's rarely make rational, logical decisions with money, but rather emotional decisions that don't make financial sense. Had an accountant on there who said he was awesome with other people's money because there was no emotion involved but was terrible with his own money.

    It's pretty easy to make the argument that other people could just not do xyz and they'd have more money, and it's true enough, but human's are not robots so someone actually making the decision to live on the absolute bones of their arse for the next 5 or so years to save for a shitty house miles away from the CBD is not easy to do. Especially when life is so short/fragile a lot of people choose to experience as much as possible while they're still young and fit.

    The problem with these arguments is that they always generalise people that have completely different lives. Different backgrounds, different wants and needs, different outlooks and make their decisions based on that. For example there was an article today about a 21 year old woman that bought a house in Feilding. Good for her but personally I'd rather pay through my teeth to live in Auckland than live in fucking Feilding....



  • @No-Quarter I can't stand Latta but what you posted sounds pretty similar to the Minimilists doco on Netflix which was well worth watching .



  • @jegga said in Housing hornets' nest:

    Took me me two years of working every weekend and through Xmas to come up with the deposit and I wouldn't recommend that to anyone.

    Place across the road, which is pretty similar to mine, sold 18 months ago to people who are about the same age as when I bought mine in 2001. So I doubtless could, but not with the same degree of equity.

    Did similar to Jegga - except was working overseas for three years in a job that was paying a lot of US$ and, crucially, the exchange rate was hovering around 0.40. Worked and saved like a maniac, kissed the arses of a lot of total c#nts, nailed it up and took the cash - and wrote a cheque for this place. The extensive self medicating of that period will doubtless come back to bite me... πŸ™‚

    Variation on that model would be to work and save Auckland salaries to buy in Dunedin, where it seems you can still get decent places for, say, $350K.

    Can't see why anyone would want to be a first home buyer in Auckland at present. Especially considering my key economic theory that crashes come in years with sevens in them (in the same way that defeats to England come in years with threes). πŸ™‚



  • We bought our house in 2013 in Bromley which is about 10 minutes from the Chch CBD, but since it's the eastern side of Chch, it's not a desireable part of town, so we got a 3 bedroom house and garage for $300,000. Kiwisaver and the first home grant for the deposit.

    However, we have two full-time incomes and no children, so there's a big leg up, but also a biological ticking time bomb which may end up costing the taxpayer a packet for fertility treatment...



  • @mariner4life said in Housing hornets' nest:

    the old "stop eating at cafes so you can save for a house" argument probably looks pretty fucking unbelievable when it costs you $800K to buy a house, and the bank will only lend you 80% of that. $160K is a fuck load of lattes and smashed avo on toast. Especially given the rental market.

    It's more the principle than the latte. If people buy a latte a day, they might waste their money on other things too. At the end of the day, most people have to make sacrifices. Most people can't have it all.



  • I'm kind of in two minds on this argument.

    FUCKING WHINERS ARGUMENT
    I give @Virgil a thumbs up on the "fucking kids don't know how to sacrifice these days!" because I do see a lot of them paying stupid amounts of rent BUT still being able to afford an overseas holiday every year. Then bitching because they can't afford to live where they want i.e. Newtown in trendy boho inner-city Sydney.

    News flash, fuckers: there are houses you can afford, but not where you want to live. And especially if you're single.

    SYMPATHETIC MIDDLE AGED GUY ARGUMENT
    Real estate in Sydney is more mental than Donald Trump on bath salts. We bought our first house in late 2000 for under $270K. Put a second storey on it 6 years later for $95K and then sold in 2013 for $590K.

    Sounds great except the place we moved to was $790K. But its now in a suburb with a median price of about $1M, despite being an hour from the CBD by public transport, which is (as I said) mental.

    IN SUMMARY

    I'm jealous of those kids and their lifestyle and their trips overseas and whatnot. I have to wait until I'm retired for that shit, whereupon I'll be too old to enjoy a coke-fuelled trip through South American anyway.

    BUT if you're going to go rack up some awesome experiences, they're going to cost money, and you can't have it all.



  • @NTA apparently your kids are more than wealth, they complete your life, once you have them, you dont need anything else (least you cant afford it so you convince yourself thats the truth)



  • @taniwharugby said in Housing hornets' nest:

    @NTA apparently your kids are more than wealth, they complete your life, once you have them, you dont need anything else (least you cant afford it so you convince yourself thats the truth)

    Says people with lots of kids and little money πŸ˜‰



  • @taniwharugby said in Housing hornets' nest:

    @NTA apparently your kids are more than wealth, they complete your life, once you have them, you dont need anything else (least you cant afford it so you convince yourself thats the truth)

    Hahahaha oh yeah and they keep you young too apparently.



  • Wait... that is all bullshit??!! fucks sake guys that would have been good to know 10 months ago!

    I have sympathy for the uphill climb heaps of folks are facing if home ownership is a goal. That's a huge spectrum from folks who piss away their cash, to those that work smart and hard but can't quite pull it together for whatever reason, plus everything else in between.

    Dad taught us to sort your bills first. If that's a struggle then you need to earn more or spend less. When it came to property time for us he was all about thinking about what size mortgage you could theoretically pay, versus the one you actually want to pay. Working in some basic math around rates going up or down etc.

    That led us to buy in a suburb that isn't as salubrious as it's neighbours (Whitby is one). But we could afford the repayments, on what are high rates in today's market, on one income - that felt like a good safety net and covered us in case kids came earlier on in the piece.

    Looking back (to mid 2000's) it's a bit crazy what the banks offered Mr and Mrs PBZ... over 600K with no deposit, when our combined income was ok but hardly what I'd be comfortable servicing a mortgage of that size on.

    I do a bit of work around literacy and numeracy in tertiary training and workplaces. HUGE volumes of folks needing a better level of skills across the board. Financial literacy is chasing hard on the heels and obviously connects to maths skills. Makes things even tougher.



  • @NTA said in Housing hornets' nest:

    I'm kind of in two minds on this argument.

    FUCKING WHINERS ARGUMENT
    I give @Virgil a thumbs up on the "fucking kids don't know how to sacrifice these days!" because I do see a lot of them paying stupid amounts of rent BUT still being able to afford an overseas holiday every year. Then bitching because they can't afford to live where they want i.e. Newtown in trendy boho inner-city Sydney.

    News flash, fuckers: there are houses you can afford, but not where you want to live. And especially if you're single.

    SYMPATHETIC MIDDLE AGED GUY ARGUMENT
    Real estate in Sydney is more mental than Donald Trump on bath salts. We bought our first house in late 2000 for under $270K. Put a second storey on it 6 years later for $95K and then sold in 2013 for $590K.

    Sounds great except the place we moved to was $790K. But its now in a suburb with a median price of about $1M, despite being an hour from the CBD by public transport, which is (as I said) mental.

    IN SUMMARY

    I'm jealous of those kids and their lifestyle and their trips overseas and whatnot. I have to wait until I'm retired for that shit, whereupon I'll be too old to enjoy a coke-fuelled trip through South American anyway.

    BUT if you're going to go rack up some awesome experiences, they're going to cost money, and you can't have it all.

    Yeah I mean you can blame the lattΓ©s and avocado all you like, but some people could live on noodles and water for decades and never be able to save for the shittiest little shack in a place like Sydney. 1 million bucks from the CBD? Unless it's a farking cattle ranch, that is farking insane.

    Brisbane isn't too bad. Some parts are ridiculous, but there are some really good value places. Units close to the CBD are surprisingly affordable due to oversupply.

    What is weird is that there is one suburb, 16km from the CBD, that the Chinese have zeroed in on and is going ape shit in terms of prices. The prices there are ridiculous for an area that is, to put it mildly, pretty shit.



  • @Rancid-Schnitzel said in Housing hornets' nest:

    What is weird is that there is one suburb, 16km from the CBD, that the Chinese have zeroed in on and is going ape shit in terms of prices. The prices there are ridiculous for an area that is, to put it mildly, pretty shit.

    Sounds a bit like Eastwood (or "Eastwoong" as some lairs are calling it). Older, post-war builds on what was the edge of Sydney. Lovely trees and parks and whatnot, but some of that shit is just falling down.

    And I don't get it either.

    Brisvegas and Melbourne are in a bit of an oversupply crisis for apartments. Apparently there are some good prices to be had BUT you might struggle to rent them out.

    I suppose I was extremely lucky to get in when I did. I worry a bit for the kids, but then the landscape will be totally fucking different when they're heading into the market, and I suppose at this point I'll be helping them in some fashion.

    Maybe they can rent my investment property off me πŸ€” If I ever get one.



  • @NTA said in Housing hornets' nest:

    @Rancid-Schnitzel said in Housing hornets' nest:

    What is weird is that there is one suburb, 16km from the CBD, that the Chinese have zeroed in on and is going ape shit in terms of prices. The prices there are ridiculous for an area that is, to put it mildly, pretty shit.

    Sounds a bit like Eastwood (or "Eastwoong" as some lairs are calling it). Older, post-war builds on what was the edge of Sydney. Lovely trees and parks and whatnot, but some of that shit is just falling down.

    And I don't get it either.

    Brisvegas and Melbourne are in a bit of an oversupply crisis for apartments. Apparently there are some good prices to be had BUT you might struggle to rent them out.

    I suppose I was extremely lucky to get in when I did. I worry a bit for the kids, but then the landscape will be totally fucking different when they're heading into the market, and I suppose at this point I'll be helping them in some fashion.

    Maybe they can rent my investment property off me πŸ€” If I ever get one.

    Yep, it is a very mixed market here at the moment. Some suburbs going off, others going to shit. And, yes finding tenants is a real concern. We sold our investment property late last year and I was very happy to get rid of the farking thing.



  • One of the things that has struck me is the first 3 houses I lived in as a kid were fricking shitholes. Old drafty places that my old man spent every weekend working on, "gardens" that were old stumps, blackberry & so on. I was 25 before I lived in a house with 2 toilets. My neice is currrently house hunting with her boyfriend & every house they looked at is pretty much perfect, ensuites, landscaped lawns. Its basically finished.

    A fucking ensuite in a "starter" house. One of our places "technically" had a second toilet. It was in the garage and had a curtain not a door.

    On the flip side I'm not sure the current 20-30 year old generation have been taught the basic skills to replace a tap washer let alone re-do a house. So even if they bought a shit hole they'd have to pay for someone to do it. We did up all our houses & it was always just my old man & my mum painting & knocking out walls & wallpapering & so on. Its all good to tell young kids to do that, but its a learned skill, if they didn't learn it they aint got it. My grandad taught my dad a huge amount, he taught me a fair bit, I'll realistically pass down phoning a Polish bloke to my kids.

    I think there's also a case that those shithole houses are bought up buy speculators & professionals, not 1st timers, you go try buy a meth house in NZ its not 20 young couples bidding against you, its 5 professional builders.



  • @gollum that's houses now. They are all built big. All have ensuites. Those shitholes you lived in 30 years were done up and flipped years ago; or bulldozed. Building codes; compulsory building inspections; insurance requirements; bank lending criteria, council red tape, all of those things make what you talk about very very hard.

    A woman who works for me bought a doer-upper just before christmas. It sounds like the worst thing in the world. They have spent every spare moment since then working on it. Tiling, painting etc. They are lucky her husband is a tradie, otherwise they could never do it. And the kids just have to suck it up, mum and dad need to work on the house.

    There have been a few articles here on the dramatic slow-down in building approvals. It appears there is demand to build, but there are so many roadblocks. Council regulations get tighter every year (some of the hoops we have had to jump through, some resulting in major redesign). The guys building on either side of us had the same issues. We also ran in to issues with the bank, as they will lend on value, not price. So they employed a valuer to value a house that hadn't even been certified yet, let alone build. We were lucky that we could afford the gap between valuation and price. The guy next to us could not, so had to scrap his plans and start again. Apparently it is a significant issue here in Cairns, so either the build price, or the valuation model, is out of whack.

    Housing is a fucking nightmare.



  • "The Great Australian Dream"

    Yeah right. Who the fuck is going to pay for all this shit when robots have our jobs?



  • my first home (bought in 2004 after I came back from England) had wooden window frames, shitty wallpaper and in need of a paint inside and out.

    We got aluminium joinery throughout, this created another issue...a draughty house keeps fresh air so doesn't have much condensation, aluminium sealed her up tight, so we had to install a DVS to deal with that...we re-roofed, re-carpeted, stripped walls, painted, had insulation blown into the outer walls of bedrooms, new kitchen, added an office/small bedroom, heat pump and fenced the property...

    What we sold it for, I reckon we only made $30k on it after taking into account what we spent over the 8 years we were there, but most of it needed sorting so we could live in a healthy home.

    We built our next one, always spending money on the garden now!!



  • Yep single glazed aluminium windows suck , if you can pay the extra go for thermally broken double glazed.
    There is still a decent amount you can do on your house if you want to under Schedule 1 so it's worth a look if you do want to do some work to your house.

    https://www.building.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/projects-and-consents/building-work-consent-not-required-guidance.pdf

    Also I find the whole idea of McMansions bizarre, they cost more to heat , more to paint , more to maintain etc and studies have shown that people only use a small percentage of the space anyway . I'm enjoying the articles about tiny houses , some of them are very well thought out.



  • we never considered double glazing when we did our old place, but have double glazing in our new house, for those 4 days of the year it gets that cold πŸ˜‰



  • @jegga I won't say much, as the new one we are building is pretty big, but designed for in 8 years time when we have two teenage boys.

    The ones i don't understand are where you buy a small section and fill it with house. And your neighbours do the same. And everyone is just jammed in.



  • @mariner4life that is all to do with zoning under the council plans.

    Properly in town they are allowed to build closer to the boundaries, less issues with daylight angles and stuff....but other designated areas may have other regulations around property sizes for sub-division and density.


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