Canadian Politics





  • Trudeau's former Attorney General, just testified in Parliament, in meticulous detail, how Trudeau and his staff tried to get her to drop criminal charges against a corrupt company that he liked.

    https://nationalpost.com/opinion/andrew-coyne-on-jody-wilson-raybould-damning-testimony-from-a-principled-witness?video_autoplay=true

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/27/world/canada/trudeau-wilson-raybould-snc-lavalin.html



  • @Frank thanks for posting that, that AG is awesome.

    I see the Soyboy has a -20% approval rating and there’s an election this year.



  • @jegga said in Canadian Politics:

    I see the Soyboy has a -20% approval rating and there’s an election this year.

    I wouldn't read too much into it; the Conservative leader Andrew Scheer is not well enough known to have a meaningful approval/disapproval rating. He is a political tomato can, plus the other prospective leader who he narrowly defeated after the last election, Maxime Bernier, has formed his own party and will likely wedge the conservatives if they decide to play the centre.

    Quebec went conservative for the first time in decades last year, as did New Brunswick, and Ontario pushed the Libs out of power to a point where they were defunded holding less than 5 seats - the tide does seem to be going that way. But I still think it is very likely Trudeau is returned and the NDP (a party further left than Trudeau in a three party system) will take the real pounding.



  • @rotated Great point about the approval rating. Pretty meanIngless until the campaign and it against someone



  • The other issue to consider is much like NZ, part of Canada's identity is being "not USA". Given the distribution of most power to the provinces immigration is the only vexing issue currently and it's going to be very tricky for a conservative to run hard against Trudeau on that issue without veering uncomfortably far into Trump territory for the Canadian public.

    Say what you like about Trudeau but he does have a statsmanlike pedigree/appearance that is appealing to those that keep only a cursory eye on proceedings. I think Canada would prefer a seemingly well meaning empty suit than an abrasive type.



  • @rotated said in Canadian Politics:

    The other issue to consider is much like NZ, part of Canada's identity is being "not USA". Given the distribution of most power to the provinces immigration is the only vexing issue currently and it's going to be very tricky for a conservative to run hard against Trudeau on that issue without veering uncomfortably far into Trump territory for the Canadian public.

    Say what you like about Trudeau but he does have a statsmanlike pedigree/appearance that is appealing to those that keep only a cursory eye on proceedings. I think Canada would prefer a seemingly well meaning empty suit than an abrasive type.

    Good post . Harper was around for quite a while though wasn’t he?



  • @rotated said in Canadian Politics:

    The other issue to consider is much like NZ, part of Canada's identity is being "not USA". Given the distribution of most power to the provinces immigration is the only vexing issue currently and it's going to be very tricky for a conservative to run hard against Trudeau on that issue without veering uncomfortably far into Trump territory for the Canadian public.

    Say what you like about Trudeau but he does have a statsmanlike pedigree/appearance that is appealing to those that keep only a cursory eye on proceedings. I think Canada would prefer a seemingly well meaning empty suit than an abrasive type.

    Do you think the Frenchiness of Bernier will count against him? I saw his interview with Rubin and he seems pretty clued up..just hard to listen to.



  • Problem for Trudeau and the boomers is that they remember his father. He was polarizing, half of them hated Pierre, but NONE of the people who hated Justin’s father EVER believed he was a lightweight. The people who hated him knew best how formidible an opponent he was, truly a giant. By contrast the kid is a featherweight, and those boomers — even the ones who voted for him — don’t see him as a chip off the old block or the apple falling far from the tree, they see him as crazy flower-child Margaret’s kid, maybe a little too much reefer hanging out with the Stones at a young age turned his brain to porridge, and they know he’s not a tough brawler with an acid tongue like his dad.



  • @jegga said in Canadian Politics:

    Good post . Harper was around for quite a while though wasn’t he?

    Yep for sure; I only turned up in Canada for the final few years of his run but he was very much a conservative whose strong suit was his economic credentials not unlike Howard in Australia and was voted out in much the same way; partly fatigue, partly the hot new thing and partly they just got too draconian on a few issues.

    @Rembrandt said in Canadian Politics:

    Do you think the Frenchiness of Bernier will count against him? I saw his interview with Rubin and he seems pretty clued up..just hard to listen to.

    Frenchiness is almost mandatory. Seven of the thirteen post-WWII PMs were from Quebec ridings, with two of those non-QC PMs being mid-term replacements of less than a year. It is an unofficial requirement for all party leaders to speak French - so it is pretty much expected.

    Bernier is going to have issues because he on the outside in a three party system and is the hardest on immigration (therefore the easiest to compare smear) and is deadset against supply control in the dairy and poultry industry which leads to big lobby dollars coming in against him.

    He would thrive in MMP though.



  • @rotated yeah the impression I got was more that they were sick of Harper more than anything else and that’s how their Jacinda got in .



  • @Salacious-Crumb said in Canadian Politics:

    Problem for Trudeau and the boomers is that they remember his father. He was polarizing, half of them hated Pierre, but NONE of the people who hated Justin’s father EVER believed he was a lightweight. The people who hated him knew best how formidible an opponent he was, truly a giant. By contrast the kid is a featherweight, and those boomers — even the ones who voted for him — don’t see him as a chip off the old block or the apple falling far from the tree, they see him as crazy flower-child Margaret’s kid, maybe a little too much reefer hanging out with the Stones at a young age turned his brain to porridge, and they know he’s not a tough brawler with an acid tongue like his dad.

    Do you live in Canada Crumb? (not sarcastic genuine question).

    My experience among the boomers in Ontario is that he has exceed expectations. It was made widely known during the election before entering politics his highest level of employment was a substitute drama teacher. People knew they were electing on genetics and fatigue alone (and of course... he does have great hair).

    Yes he is a disingenuous virtue-signaller (or a bit of a dag if such a term existed in Canada), but given how most power lies with the provinces isn't that half the role (in peacetime, with no major economic crises). I would say that the general consensus is he sticks up for Canada's interest well, they like him taking it to Saudi Arabia, they think plays indignant on the international stage and they like the contrast with Trump.

    Depending on immigration formalities I would/will Conservative or Bernier's party but even I would have to admit they absolutely schooled Trump on the NAFTA renegotiation.


  • Banned

    @rotated said in Canadian Politics:

    The other issue to consider is much like NZ, part of Canada's identity is being "not USA". Given the distribution of most power to the provinces immigration is the only vexing issue currently and it's going to be very tricky for a conservative to run hard against Trudeau on that issue without veering uncomfortably far into Trump territory for the Canadian public.

    ** Say what you like about Trudeau but he does have a statsmanlike pedigree/appearance that is appealing to those that keep only a cursory eye on proceedings.** I think Canada would prefer a seemingly well meaning empty suit than an abrasive type.

    Yep, and it's those people who tend to decide elections. It can get ugly when they eventually take a closer look at who they're voting for but that can take an election cycle or two.





  • @rotated

    No, but have travelled there many times and know connected people in Ottawa.

    (Did you know Trudeau’s chief of staff is the daughter of an Okker?)



  • This is not good news for Canada

    Consumption spending grew at the slowest pace in almost four years, housing fell by the most in a decade, business investment dropped sharply for a second straight quarter, and domestic demand posted its largest decline since 2015.

    https://business.financialpost.com/news/economy/weaker-gdp-than-anyone-expected-shows-canadian-growth-stalling

    contrast to the 4th quarter of the U.S.

    “Consumer spending continued to grow solidly and, most encouragingly, business investment growth recovered sharply after a dip in the third quarter. Despite big external headwinds and financial market volatility in the fourth quarter, U.S. firms are not retrenching sharply on capex.”

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/consumer-spending-during-shutdown-rd-growth-led-to-gdp-surprise-economists-say-2019-02-28

    This could be an aberration. Need a few more quarters for confirmation.



  • So I'm hearing Treudeau might be getting the boot on corruption. Wishful thinking?



  • Could be criminal charges. That former Justice Minister who they attempted to prrssure, and then demoted, and who blew the whistle at the parliamentary committee last week has a big pair of onions. Real guts standing up to the PMO.

    And strangely enough somewhat tangentially related are the weird spooky connections of Trudeau to the NXIVM sex-cult via the Bronfman heiress, all tied up in the SNC Lavalin deal in Libya. Could be ginned-up Maddow-style connect-the-dots conspiracy theory, but something to keep an eye on.



  • Grab your popcorn, the first minister has resigned over this .Effectively says she can’t support Trudeau anymore in her statement. Between this and the Canadian economy flagging it could be the end of the Trudeau government.

    http://jphilpott.liberal.ca/news-nouvelles/statement/



  • @jegga You can add a second minister to the list now: Treasury Board president Jane Philpott, considered a star minister, said in a resignation letter that it was “untenable” for her to continue in the cabinet because she could not defend the government.


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