SpaceX



  • I had an advert right on take-off, that was a bit stink. Every other part of that was wicked! Cheers for posting @Kirwan Really cool



  • I didn’t have ads on mine, I might have given you guys a dud link.



  • @Kirwan said in SpaceX Crew Demo:

    @NTA you must not be live?

    Dunno. Says it is.

    Screenshot_20190412-085237~2.png



  • @Kirwan said in SpaceX Crew Demo:

    I didn’t have ads on mine, I might have given you guys a dud link.

    No biggie. This "Space & Universe" channel is a bit poo.

    Boosters landed. Awesome part over



  • Mine was delayed and I pushed the next icon on the video to skip it live. Must have broken the ads doing that?







  • @NTA Never gets old watching those things land, three times for that specific rocket.



  • 15mins and they will be deploying the satellites, that might be interesting to see



  • @Kirwan damn just missed it. REWIND!



  • @NTA Not much to see in that one, they just floated away. Kind of cool, crazy to think 60 launched at the same time.



  • @Kirwan agreed - I wanted them to ripple-fire into space 😉



  • @NTA Ditto. Been watching too much Expanse.



  • @Kirwan fucking top show. Need to find S3 😠



  • @NTA it hasnt had a release date yet as far as I can see, but think it was usually mid-year when it aired.



  • @NTA it was very hard to find legally, and I looked in many places.





  • @Kirwan that is some awesome web design



  • @NTA isn’t it just? Almost calming.



  • @Kirwan opened it on my phone and just spent a minute looking at the first panel





  • @Stockcar86 space jizz shot!! Crudeness aside it is amazing!



  • @NTA said in SpaceX Crew Demo:

    @Kirwan fucking top show. Need to find S3 😠

    Looks like the move to Amazon is kicking into gear, turned up in my Prime app with air dates of 2nd of August for the first three seasons.

    Season 4 to follow, with less restrictions so should be even better.



  • @Kirwan already paying for YouTube Premium ($23), Netflix ($13), and KayoSports ($20). Would find it hard to squeeze another $12 in there so might wait for S3 to drop, and binge it on the free trial 😉



  • @NTA yeah, I’m keeping Prime for Good Omens, the Expanse, Jack Ryan, and now the new Picard show.

    Netflix without Marvel is in danger from Disney+ later in the year.



  • So picturesque, worth watching to see the rocket launch in fog. Like watching a movie.



  • @Kirwan, fellow nerds: feast your eyes on this



  • @Kirwan said in SpaceX Crew Demo:

    @NTA yeah, I’m keeping Prime for Good Omens, the Expanse, Jack Ryan, and now the new Picard show.

    Netflix without Marvel is in danger from Disney+ later in the year.

    I don’t think the Marvel shows rated that highly for Netflix and they’re apparently doing well out of their original content. However the recently announced loss of Friends will be damanging as apparently they had huge viewership in the US!

    Edit: just clicked I responded to a month old post in a non tv thread. 😂



  • @Nepia it’s all good. It’s something about the costs after season three, Netflix has to take more onboard.

    Effectively they are Netflix originals.

    Last Jessica Jones was great again, hope it comes back in some form or another.



  • Tangent but holy shit - the next step in drones/machines going to other planets.

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/06/nasa-will-fly-billion-dollar-quadcopter-titan-saturn-s-methane-rich-moon



  • @Paekakboyz That's farken cool. 15 years away tho 😐



  • NASA fucking rules

    At the Brisbane Museum last month, the guy there was telling me about this up coming mission to send a craft through the geysers that blow up from one of the moons that is almost entirely water. Idea is to collect water samples and look for life. How fucking rad is that?



  • From this: https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2019/06/new-video-shows-how-humanity-could-spread-throughout-the-galaxy/

    Comes this:

    
    **New Video Shows How Humanity Could Spread Throughout The Galaxy**
    
    A fascinating competition to devise an efficient way of colonising the galaxy has resulted in this beautiful, and provocative, visualisation.
    
    This is the 10th running of the Global Trajectory Optimisation Competition (GTOC X), which is organised by the Mission Design and Navigation section of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
    
    These contests present complex problems having to do with space travel, to which aerospace engineers, physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists must devise efficient solutions.
    
    GTOC X says these competitions are “a way to foster innovation in optimisation of interplanetary trajectories and cross-fertilisation of ideas between researchers in optimisation and in astrodynamics.”
    
    For the latest competition, contestants had to settle the Milky Way galaxy in the most efficient way possible given the constraints laid out by the rules of the contest.
    
    The winner of the competition was a joint team of China’s National University of Defence Technology and the Xi’an Satellite Control Center (their visualisation is available here), while second place went to a team from China’s Tsinghua University (video not yet available). Third place went to the Advanced Concepts Team (ACT) from the European Space Agency.
    
    At a recent two-day workshop on interstellar exploration, ACT showcased its entry, which was uploaded to YouTube
    
    Each tiny white speck in the simulation represents a habitable star, while the brightly coloured lines represent the journeys taken by spacecraft between settled stars. From start to finish, the simulation encompasses tens of millions of years.
    
    Here’s the scenario as it was presented to the contestants: About 10,000 years from now, humanity has decided to colonise the galaxy. A total of 100,000 star systems have been identified in advance as being habitable, and thus suitable for settlement.
    
    This scenario takes place in the far future, but no radical forms of space travel exist, such as zipping through worm holes or other forms of faster-than-light travel. That said, the technology is such that long-term space travel is possible, with ships capable of supporting settlers for hundreds of thousands of generations.
    
    “The task... is to settle as many of the [100,000] star systems as possible, in as uniform a spatial distribution as possible, while using as little propulsive velocity change as possible,” according to the GOTX contest guidelines. “The settlement of the galaxy starts by fanning out from our home star, Sol. Once another star is settled, further settlements can fan out from that star.”
    
    Competitors were supplied with a pre-configured set of the 100,000 habitable star systems, along with the motions of these stars through space and the physics required to move the spaceships, among other criteria.
    
    For the colonisation mission, the settlers departed Earth in three Mother Ships (shown in blue in the ACT simulation) and Two Fast ships (shown in green). Each mothership contained 10 Settlement Pods, which could be released once a Mother Ship reached a target star system.
    
    Settlement Pods were required to perform manoeuvres to match the velocity of their target stars, while the velocity of Mother Ships were not affected by the star (gravitational slingshot effects were not allowed). A star was considered “settled” once a Settlement Pod or Fast Ship arrived there.
    
    Once a star system was settled, and at least 2 million years had elapsed, a colony could dispatch up to three Settler Ships (shown by the reddish-pink streaks). Each Settler Ship could rendezvous with and settle a single star system. Stars could only be settled once.
    
    It’s fair to say this scenario and the constraints provided are somewhat artificial, and not necessarily indicative of an actual future mission to colonise the galaxy. That said, exercises such as these are meaningful for astrobiologists and SETI researchers.
    
    The general patterns seen in the simulations are probably not too far removed from how a colonisation wave might spread from a host star system, whether it be from Earth or a distant star system.
    
    Indeed, an intriguing (or disturbing) takeaway from this simulation is the apparent ease and speed at which an entire galaxy can be subsumed, or at least explored, by an adventurous civilisation. Our galaxy is around 13.5 billion years old, or 13,500 million years old.
    
    The GTOC X entries saw their settlers sweep across the galaxy over timescales no longer than 90 million years—a scant 0.67 per cent the age of the galaxy. Formal studies on the matter have attained similar results. Such is the power of exponential growth, which these simulations beautifully illustrate.
    
    Yet, despite the Milky Way’s extreme age, we don’t appear to live in a galaxy overrun by extraterrestrial civilizations. This is an exceptionally weird observation, one dubbed the Fermi Paradox. It’s not immediately obvious why our galaxy appears to be uncolonized, and this latest simulation only adds fuel to the fire.
    
    Duncan Forgan, a computational astrophysicist and author of Solving Fermi’s Paradox, said the new simulation is “definitely relevant” to this ongoing conundrum.
    
    “After all, its strongest variant is that we might expect to see interstellar craft from other planets in our solar system, and the fact we don’t tells us something important,” Forgan told Gizmodo. “What that something is, is of course up for debate!”
    
    Forgan, who wasn’t involved with the GTOC X contest, said a smart way to approach the Fermi Paradox is to ask if humans can achieve either effective interstellar communication or interstellar travel.
    
    “Workshops like these demonstrate that there is an appetite to achieve these aims, for the purposes of scientific exploration,” he said. “If humans can do it, surely other technological civilizations could do it, too.”
    


  • @Kirwan said in SpaceX Crew Demo:

    @Nepia it’s all good. It’s something about the costs after season three, Netflix has to take more onboard.

    Effectively they are Netflix originals.

    Last Jessica Jones was great again, hope it comes back in some form or another.

    Oh yeah, I was meaning their non licensed from other studios/networks originals as that’s all drying up as the streaming landscape in the US is about to get silly.

    I can see a rise in illegal downloads coming.

    Never really got the Marvel TV buzz, didn’t like the first Daredevil which kind of set the scene I guess, and the Jessica Jones S1 was decent but too long, which actually was the same for Punisher. Clearly not my bag which is strange as they’re all in my wheel house.



  • @Nepia the thing they do well is the slow burn plot with a big payoff. TV for adults instead of kids with no attention span.

    In Daredevil, the single tracking shot sequences were amazing. The escape in season three on one take is incredible.

    Punisher left me cold, it was just too bleak. Never watched the second one.



  • RocketLab launchinga gain in 8 minutes



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  • @Kirwan said in SpaceX Crew Demo:

    @Nepia the thing they do well is the slow burn plot with a big payoff. TV for adults instead of kids with no attention span.

    In Daredevil, the single tracking shot sequences were amazing. The escape in season three on one take is incredible.

    Punisher left me cold, it was just too bleak. Never watched the second one.

    Oh burn. 😉

    I never got to S3 of Daredevil, one was enough and that's the one everyone usually rates the best. I actually don't like the actor, he was also in Boardwalk Empire and I didn't like him in that either.



  • @Nepia reads bad, but wasn’t meant to!



  • Space X is live;


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