Post-Apocalyptic Sports



  • Mods, feel free to move - I couldn't see anywhere pulling together what post C19 sports could look like

    Anyway, just reading the article below. Interesting, but they don't seem to raise the prospect of allowing people who have had C19 to slip the lockdown and attend sport.

    But yes, big crowds are a massive risk unless there's a vaccine, or it's properly eliminated in the community (NZ only option I think at the moment).

    https://www.si.com/mlb/2020/04/10/sports-arent-coming-back-soon



  • OK, I read the article. It sucked.

    They've based their assumptions off the current isolation/testing rules, and effectively ignored possible changes. I think the NRL may get this right - if you can test people frequently, and you can start without community transmission, you can run a comp behind closed doors.

    that picture changes fundamentally when you get the '1 hour' test that I linked to yesterday out of Canada - basically a single machine per team, and test everyone every day.

    If you know who in the population has had it, then they can attend in a crowd as the risk goes way down.

    So basically a poxy article with little thought that isn't particularly well thought out in my opinion. Bah humbug.



  • @nzzp Day 20 of lockdown and you're having a fine old chat with yourself here...



  • @voodoo said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    @nzzp Day 20 of lockdown and you're having a fine old chat with yourself here...

    yeah, trying to start a sports conversation on a sports forum that's turned into a combination of teh cooking channel and the home show.

    Edit: this C19 has screwed us all up



  • @nzzp what is this "sport" thing you speak of?



  • @nzzp said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    this C19 has screwed us all up

    I actually think it's made vast improvements to many of you. Personality wise at least.



  • @R-L So a bunch of procrastinating, pissed layabouts have turned into what?



  • @Snowy really quite funny guys...



  • Don't know about the rest of you lot, but I've been doing and coordinating extensive work on this for my sport, which is chess.

    Competition chess is 4 arms - over the board (OTB), correspondence (originally by post, but email when that became common, and now via online servers), online, and problem-solving (get shown a position and find the best move).

    Of these, OTB chess is basically out of the question until alert level 1 or elimination. The others are fine, and don't need any assistance, but clubs are based around getting together to play in person, so pandemics are an obvious block to that. Since it will be some time before we can go back to playing in person, clubs have been working together to set up online presences at online chess sites (Lichess.org and Chess.com are the preferred options), and to arrange events for members. Interclub matches are on the cards as well, which is great.

    People had been worried about potential cheating (if you're using a computer to play, pretty easy to use chess programs to assist), which had long been a barrier, but turns out players having to identify themselves by name is quite a deterrent. Big changes ahead, but it's a lot more positive than it looked initially.

    Incidentally, chess clubs in NZ have a long history - Canterbury Chess Club (my club) is the oldest and was founded in 1866, with Auckland, Wellington and Otago not long after. Otago Chess Club is the longest registered Incorporated Society in NZ (1895). The NZ championship is the longest running national championship in the world (Scotland has an older first event, but had breaks due to wars).



  • @Godder great post fella.

    My boy went into ChessKids for a while- any opinion on how that compares?

    Chess is great, and the internet has massive video support for folk to improve. So differetn to my day with crappy books that were hard to work through.



  • my only association with Chess is that when i was playing rep rugby, and having away games around the state, we created the Ingham Chess Club to tell people where we were from, so we didn't besmirch the good name of our Union when we were acting like fuckwits. Pretty sure that club is still banned from a few backpackers.

    Also my son plays and really enjoys it



  • @mariner4life said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    Also my son plays and really enjoys it

    He beats you, doesn't he 🙂



  • @nzzp said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    @mariner4life said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    Also my son plays and really enjoys it

    He beats you, doesn't he 🙂

    i haven't played him i don't think. He probably would, i haven't played in 25 years



  • @mariner4life said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    @nzzp said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    @mariner4life said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    Also my son plays and really enjoys it

    He beats you, doesn't he 🙂

    i haven't played him i don't think. He probably would, i haven't played in 25 years

    I play with my boys in winter, it's great fun. The older is a good player, he beats me if I do something stupid. And since I have brain farts regularly (supporting the Blues, for instnace), it's often a good game 🙂



  • @nzzp Chesskids is good, both the English and Aussie businesses of that name have good programmes for kids (I'm not sure if they're connected or just came up with the same name independently).

    Agree that it's so much easier to learn online or with software/videos than via books like I did, although successful club play still requires learning a bit of theory, and while videos are best for most people, apparently some people learn better with written material and a real board and set.

    I also like that chess games can be notated (written down) so we can play through games from the 1500s.

    @mariner4life That's awesome! I've heard a few stories over the years about drinking sessions from actual chess teams and tournaments, so it's not as farfetched as it sounds (the concept of a chess team being rowdy while on the turps).



  • @nzzp said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    Mods, feel free to move - I couldn't see anywhere pulling together what post C19 sports could look like

    Anyway, just reading the article below. Interesting, but they don't seem to raise the prospect of allowing people who have had C19 to slip the lockdown and attend sport.

    But yes, big crowds are a massive risk unless there's a vaccine, or it's properly eliminated in the community (NZ only option I think at the moment).

    https://www.si.com/mlb/2020/04/10/sports-arent-coming-back-soon

    So if you've had it, you can't be a carrier?



  • @nzzp said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    @mariner4life said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    @nzzp said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    @mariner4life said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    Also my son plays and really enjoys it

    He beats you, doesn't he 🙂

    i haven't played him i don't think. He probably would, i haven't played in 25 years

    I play with my boys in winter, it's great fun. The older is a good player, he beats me if I do something stupid. And since I have brain farts regularly (supporting the Blues, for instnace), it's often a good game 🙂

    I played my 7yr old today. I let him win, but he still did 2 moves that I hadn't seen and I had to pretend I'd left open on purpose...



  • @Bones said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    @nzzp said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    Mods, feel free to move - I couldn't see anywhere pulling together what post C19 sports could look like

    Anyway, just reading the article below. Interesting, but they don't seem to raise the prospect of allowing people who have had C19 to slip the lockdown and attend sport.

    But yes, big crowds are a massive risk unless there's a vaccine, or it's properly eliminated in the community (NZ only option I think at the moment).

    https://www.si.com/mlb/2020/04/10/sports-arent-coming-back-soon

    So if you've had it, you can't be a carrier?

    I don't think so. maybe some like @Kirwan knows though, or @canefan



  • @nzzp my understanding is you can't be a carrier. It's like the flu. You get it and it goes away, it would appear that you can contract it again. But the second and consecutive times your body will be more geared to fighting it as it will have developed antibodies. The reason why it's so bad at the moment is it is so different from other coronaviruses we have faced before (cold and flu) that our bodies can't deal with it





  • @Godder
    You might enjoy this documentary about the game Go - which was harder for AI to compete in than chess.



  • @Frank AlphaGo was very interesting to chess, and its successor, AlphaZero has dominated in computer chess (computer programme competitions are quite popular).

    I remember Kasparov losing the match against Deeper Blue (he beat Deep Blue in the first match, and IBM put in more money), and programmes started winning all the matches, so it was good to see Australian Grandmaster (GM), David Smerdon, crush a computer programme, Komodo, recently - https://www.chess.com/news/view/smerdon-beats-komodo-5-1-with-knight-odds . Granted, the computer was giving him a Knight, but still, good to see humans are still able to roughly keep up.



  • @Godder said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    I remember Kasparov losing the match against Deeper Blue (he beat Deep Blue in the first match, and IBM put in more money),

    Not only that, but if I recall correctly, Deeper Blue was being recoded on the fly by chess Masters and 'tuned' to Kasparov to exploit his weaknesses (well, lack of strength).

    Since then computer power has just gone nuts, and frankly it's not even close any more is it 🙂 I for one, welcome our new chess computer overlords



  • Kasparov's complaint against IBM when he lost was that he suspected IBM changed the computer programming during the six-game rematch, after Kasparov won the first game in the rematch.

    And when he asked IBM to show him the programming logs IBM said they couldn't because it had been dismantled.



  • When they get quantum computing working reliably, humans will be like a bug on a windscreen for games like chess.



  • @Kirwan said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    When they get quantum computing working reliably, humans will be like a bug on a windscreen for games like chess.

    we already are!

    well, I am, and so are 99.999% of the population 🙂 Seriously though, humans can't compete with computers in theory games like Chess



  • The coolest/scariest thing about AI gaming was when they realised they should stop teaching it rules and just letting it learn for itself and it just took off.



  • @voodoo Yeah, when that had the AlphaGo masters scratching their heads about the new tactics that was huge.





  • @Donsteppa said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    Might be some tough choices ahead for sporting anti-vaxxers:

    https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2020/apr/19/novak-djokovic-coronavirus-covid-19-vaccination-tennis

    If you're a competitor you'd be hoping he sticks to his principles.



  • Chess has adapted quickly to be an internet-based game. Ditto Bridge and Poker.

    Can't see why we can't have matchplay golf tournaments as long as they players stay more than three metres apart and no spectators on the course.

    Weightlifting could still work with the competitors lifting remotely. Diving and ice skating could work too with remote competitions.

    Backyard gymnastics could become a thing.

    Tennis might be a goer with the player sitting further apart at the change of ends.



  • Tennis would arguably require a new ball for each point, or at least each game (service game, not a match) with only the serving player handling the ball. Definitely doable though.

    Other racquet sports could be a goer as long as they are across a net and can replace the ball/shuttlecock regularly.

    Add other competitive board and card games to the list above e.g. Scrabble, Go, Backgammon, Checkers/Draughts, Euchre etc.

    A decent-sized section and relevant gear would allow some field sports e.g. shot put, long jump etc.



  • Kidnap all the athletes, put them in solitary isolation for a month, then force them to perform in an arena.



  • I did have a laugh at BBC world news yesterday. The news ticker tape thing at the bottom said "Sport" - that was it, nothing else, just blank.



  • @Tim said in Post-Apocalyptic Sports:

    Kidnap all the athletes, put them in solitary isolation for a month, then force them to perform in an arena.

    Sort of like the Running Man?



  • @canefan I'd buy that for a dollar!

    Wrong movie I know, but the right level of 80s action cheese IMO



  • Sounds like pro wrestling...







  • when the football codes come back, i would like people to realise that their darling son or daughter could catch a fucking virus from going to the shops, so maybe getting high tackled a couple of times isn't the worst thing in the world. And for sports administrators to realise this, and relax about physicality.

    Bring back the biff in league. I want the old days back. This game is, for the majority, large humans running in to each other as hard as they can, from a long way back. Bring back shoulder charges. I have a theory that the ability to put a massive shot on will stop so many 3-in-the-tackle situations, and thus the wrestle and the slow play-the-ball. Then let the fights back. People who love league love big hits and fights. There is none of either in today's game, and it has lost a lot of its appeal. Watching throwback games has highlighted that to me. By all means have a judiciary if shit gets out of hand. But lets get it on while they boys are playing!

    In rugby, i want rucking, big hits, and yes, the occasional stink. Bring back the enforcer! I don't think rucking really quickens up that many rucks, but it will a few, wingers and fullbacks won't be diving in with hands if a couple of flankers are in close proximity. There will be less hands if someone is going to stand on them. And it might make the cannonball cleanout redundant, making the game safer. And if niggly fuckwits want to clap and rub heads, i want some gnarly veteran to stick one on him, with only the threat of a solid talking to from the ref to make him think twice. Seatbelt tackles are not swinging arms to the head. People falling in to shoulders are not swinging arms to the head. Re-think the high tackle rulings!

    In short, i want my physical football codes back. When i see harder hits in AFL i know things have gone wrong. Tell Karen that her babies will love it, and let the boys play ref!


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