Coronavirus - South Africa



  • Hi All

    I see there are thread for New Zealand and Australia. I have checked but I don't see any focus on South Africa so I thought I would just fill you in how things are going on this side of the Indian Ocean.

    I know I tend to write long winded posts and if that's not your thing it is probably best to skip this post.

    At a glance

    South Africa had its first confirmed case on the 5th of March with the government declaring a state of emergency on the 15th. South Africa has been in lock down since the 26th of March .

    Our scorecard reads -

    "As of 27 April 2020, there were 4793 confirmed cases and 90 confirmed deaths, from 178470 tests" (per Wikipedia)

    So, em, how are we doing?

    Not that bad to be honest. Our death rate is at about 1.5 per million, which pretty good considering. The government deserves credit for acting swiftly and decisively. The state of emergency was triggered immediately upon confirmation of local transmissions and the lockdown has been successful containing the spread (even if you don't trust the testing figures, the death rates are extremely low considering the prevalence of HIV, TB and Hypertension in the community.

    Lockdown

    It's pretty brutal, only essential goods and services are being allowed and essential is defined extremely narrowly.
    No cigarettes, no booze, no hot food or take aways.
    Your kettle broke? Bad luck.
    You need a padlock to secure your girlfriends house that was being renovated when lockdown happened? Tough shit.

    This has obviously done tremendous damage to the economy, but personally I have been blessed to have been insulated from the worst of it. I work in the back office of a large bank and we were largely working from home prior to all of this happening so it hasn't made much of difference there. My family are either retired (the loss on the stock exchange is paper losses at this stage), in similar positions as myself or working in essential services. We will have to see how badly it all plays out, but at this I can't really add anything except the macro economic data which is pretty bleak.

    Ramaphosa announced last week that some restrictions will be lifted, but our lockdown will still be stricter than what we've seen in Britain and the US. Some alcohol sales and home deliveries through online retailers will only be allowed after the next round of easing of restrictions.

    In the meantime I am teaching myself how to homebrew cider - its drinkable, but needs more time for the sugar to ferment, hopefully the second batch due next week will be better.

    The media

    I have found the media coverage on the big international news stations impossible to watch. Each one has done the same segment multiple times now and it goes like this -

    "Though Africa has been spared from the brunt of the virus so far, it is inevitable that everything is going to go to shit. (shows Lagos and some local issue happening in Nigeria) Obviously with these problems happening, how can the people of Nairobi be safe...blah blah blah..."

    Its infuriating. The journalist are telling the story they expect to find, rather than doing any analysis of what is actually happening. Hell they might even be right, but the process by which things go to shit is worth reporting on. Instead we get something that any high school senior could write from home with a couple of pictures of poor black faces tagged on.





  • Hi Sid. How is the lockdown being policed? Is it just the main urban areas? I assume it would be almost impossible to maintain it country-wide. I have a friend in Zim and she tells me it is complete chaos - over and above the normal chaos by a significant margin. All that with no real data either.



  • @pakman

    Though the article is more positive than I discussed in my post, it basically makes the same mistakes.

    Three countries are mentioned in the piece; South Africa, Egypt and Kenya. Does the authors know how far Cape Town is from Nairobi, because I do because I've driven it. Its 7120km by car and if you do it at leisurely pace it will take about two and half weeks.

    I don't know how much trade there is between Egypt and South Africa, but it is hell of lot less than there is between South Africa and Britain. The situation in London has a far greater affect on South Africa than Egypt and the fact we nominally share a landmass is all but irrelevant.



  • @SidBarret which city are you in mate? I have a few friends in Cape Town who seem to be pretty happy about things down there. Seems to be one big smash up of wine and braai.



  • @Catogrande

    How is it being policed? Here in Cape Town the police do random patrols and people are chased off beaches/parks etc. There are a couple of roadblocks where you need show a permit to travel.

    Where I live is a middle class suburb and adherence to regulations is pretty high (no-one out jogging/walking their dog etc.). My girlfriend's house is in an area with a much more working class character and adherence seem to be lower (more people on the street loitering etc.)

    I can't comment on other areas because I haven't been able to leave my house in 5 weeks, but according to the news people are generally trying to adhere as best they can (with exceptions). The real struggles seem to be around minibus taxis and public transport which doesn't lend itself to social distancing.

    As for Zimbabwe - I can't repeat this enough, it is different country with very different challenges, and I have basically the same insight as anyone here about what is happening there. The best analogy I can think of right now is that Zimbabwe and South Africa has about the same relationship Britain has with Romania - there are a lot of Zimbabweans living and working in South Africa and fair bit of domestic trade (people shopping in South Africa and sending it home and South Africans tourists visiting Zimbabwe), but they are very different countries.



  • @MajorRage

    Yeah I'm Cape Town - though my wine reserves ran out three weeks back. Though I am eating very well at the moment - I have all this time to cook and all this money I am not spending in restaurants so its not all bad.



  • @SidBarret hi Sid. Thanks for the update. Have wondered how our Seffrican domiciled friends are travelling.

    I'm thinking we've had it pretty lucky either side of the Tasman ... with regard to tge virus at keast ... so far.



  • @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    In the meantime I am teaching myself how to homebrew cider - its drinkable, but needs more time for the sugar to ferment, hopefully the second batch due next week will be better.

    Start a thread if you want to chat on this and maybe pick up some tips from folk. I've brewed a couple, no expert, but produced something pretty drinkable that I enjoyed. Super easy too πŸ™‚



  • @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    It's pretty brutal, only essential goods and services are being allowed and essential is defined extremely narrowly.
    No cigarettes, no booze, no hot food or take aways.

    Yeoawch!!!!! No hot food or takeaways, I understand, but no booze!! What a way to help give up smoking



  • @booboo

    Its a pleasure πŸ™‚

    I wouldn't say we have been lucky, we have worked incredibly hard to keep the numbers down and it sucked, but we have been largely successful (so far).



  • @nzzp

    Thanks mate, will do. Out number one issue is that I don't want to wait the three - four weeks, so already know what we are doing wrong.



  • @SidBarret you shouldn't need to. Pitch a whole lot of good yeast, and you should be done in under a week. You can drink it flat - otherwise you're into secondary fermentation which is interesting with ciders.

    Seriously consider throwing more apple juice onto the yeast cake that develops. It should be sanitary and good to go, and will ferment like a mofo.



  • @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @MajorRage

    Yeah I'm Cape Town - though my wine reserves ran out three weeks back....

    I'm pegging you as either a very bad planner or a drunk. I'm rather hoping for the latter, we would get on so much better.



  • @nzzp hmm okay I think we need to chat. Will set up something this evening



  • @Catogrande Bit of both. A cruel little trick was played on us. When the lock down was originally announced it was scheduled to run for 3 weeks, but was then extended by a further 2 weeks and then booze sales were extended indefinitely.

    We stocked up for three weeks, finished it in 2 and now we're just waiting (hence the my apartment smelling like a brewery, which it kinda is)



  • @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @Catogrande Bit of both. A cruel little trick was played on us. When the lock down was originally announced it was scheduled to run for 3 weeks, but was then extended by a further 2 weeks and then booze sales were extended indefinitely.

    We stocked up for three weeks, finished it in 2 and now we're just waiting (hence the my apartment smelling like a brewery, which it kinda is)

    That is not the way to keep the population onside. At least dear old Boris over here recognises that alcohol sales is an essential service. Mind you that might be a little self serving.



  • @Catogrande Yeah, it's a bit of a double edge sword - alcohol is banned to stop people doing stupid shit (and to close down the supply chain), but we have seen some looting of liquor stores and depos.

    The police minister is super keen on the prohibition and there has been notable drop in violent crime over the lock down period (see the FT article above).





  • @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @pakman

    Though the article is more positive than I discussed in my post, it basically makes the same mistakes.

    Three countries are mentioned in the piece; South Africa, Egypt and Kenya. Does the authors know how far Cape Town is from Nairobi, because I do because I've driven it. Its 7120km by car and if you do it at leisurely pace it will take about two and half weeks.

    I don't know how much trade there is between Egypt and South Africa, but it is hell of lot less than there is between South Africa and Britain. The situation in London has a far greater affect on South Africa than Egypt and the fact we nominally share a landmass is all but irrelevant.

    Recognise that SA is worlds apart from Central Africa, but was an article I'd happened to see.

    A relatively low reliance on public transport is likely to be the Continent's get out of jail card, given PT (including air travel) is main conduit for CV transmission.



  • @pakman

    I woke up in foul mood this morning, so I apologise for my tone...

    Yeah, we are still waiting for the scientist to confirm whether the buffalo I depend on to get to work can be a carrier of covid.

    I can kind of accept that people don't know how Africa operates; I have made the point in this very thread that news coverage of Africa poor. But it still astounds me that someone would make a statement like the below, in thread where the lack of good information is being discussed.

    A relatively low reliance on public transport is likely to be the Continent's get out of jail card, given PT (including air travel) is main conduit for CV transmission
    

    I can't speak as an expert on transport in all of Africa, because you know, I am not a transportation economist and Africa is fucking big place. I was even trying to find a headline figure on how many people depend on public transport in Africa, but again, serious researchers avoid generalising across such a large and diverse area.

    08e4105d-0794-4ea6-a565-46a0cf8f67e8-image.png https://medium.com/impact-engineered/the-african-commute-city-transport-trends-cf369e5106bd

    Do I need to find a reputable research paper to suggest that Africans rely heavily on public transport? For the purposes of an rugby chat forum, probably not. What I can confidently comment on is the situation in South Africa and less confidently on Southern and Eastern Africa that people are massively reliant on public transport to get around.

    But this rant isn't even about whether Africans rely on public transport or not - it is about the way that people just casually assume that they know something that they are clearly pig ignorant about.

    Do I blame @pakman for making a stupid comment? Yeah I kinda do, but that would not motivate me to spend thirty minutes to write whatever the fuck this rant is. What did motivate me to write this is nicotine withdrawal and the stupid narrative about Africa as a societal and economic blackhole where everything that happens is either due to some white guy coming to save us, political corruption or economic backwardness. It is fucking insulting and has these beliefs have real consequences on how people make long term decisions.



  • @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @pakman

    I woke up in foul mood this morning, so I apologise for my tone...

    Yeah, we are still waiting for the scientist to confirm whether the buffalo I depend on to get to work can be a carrier of covid.

    I can kind of accept that people don't know how Africa operates; I have made the point in this very thread that news coverage of Africa poor. But it still astounds me that someone would make a statement like the below, in thread where the lack of good information is being discussed.

    A relatively low reliance on public transport is likely to be the Continent's get out of jail card, given PT (including air travel) is main conduit for CV transmission
    

    I can't speak as an expert on transport in all of Africa, because you know, I am not a transportation economist and Africa is fucking big place. I was even trying to find a headline figure on how many people depend on public transport in Africa, but again, serious researchers avoid generalising across such a large and diverse area.

    08e4105d-0794-4ea6-a565-46a0cf8f67e8-image.png https://medium.com/impact-engineered/the-african-commute-city-transport-trends-cf369e5106bd

    Do I need to find a reputable research paper to suggest that Africans rely heavily on public transport? For the purposes of an rugby chat forum, probably not. What I can confidently comment on is the situation in South Africa and less confidently on Southern and Eastern Africa that people are massively reliant on public transport to get around.

    But this rant isn't even about whether Africans rely on public transport or not - it is about the way that people just casually assume that they know something that they are clearly pig ignorant about.

    Do I blame @pakman for making a stupid comment? Yeah I kinda do, but that would not motivate me to spend thirty minutes to write whatever the fuck this rant is. What did motivate me to write this is nicotine withdrawal and the stupid narrative about Africa as a societal and economic blackhole where everything that happens is either due to some white guy coming to save us, political corruption or economic backwardness. It is fucking insulting and has these beliefs have real consequences on how people make long term decisions.

    You've got the wrong end of the stick here, by failing to appreciate the significance of the word relatively.

    Interested to know if you're aware of any African public transport system to rival NYC subway or London Underground in terms of major population density.



  • @pakman said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @pakman

    I woke up in foul mood this morning, so I apologise for my tone...

    Yeah, we are still waiting for the scientist to confirm whether the buffalo I depend on to get to work can be a carrier of covid.

    I can kind of accept that people don't know how Africa operates; I have made the point in this very thread that news coverage of Africa poor. But it still astounds me that someone would make a statement like the below, in thread where the lack of good information is being discussed.

    A relatively low reliance on public transport is likely to be the Continent's get out of jail card, given PT (including air travel) is main conduit for CV transmission
    

    I can't speak as an expert on transport in all of Africa, because you know, I am not a transportation economist and Africa is fucking big place. I was even trying to find a headline figure on how many people depend on public transport in Africa, but again, serious researchers avoid generalising across such a large and diverse area.

    08e4105d-0794-4ea6-a565-46a0cf8f67e8-image.png https://medium.com/impact-engineered/the-african-commute-city-transport-trends-cf369e5106bd

    Do I need to find a reputable research paper to suggest that Africans rely heavily on public transport? For the purposes of an rugby chat forum, probably not. What I can confidently comment on is the situation in South Africa and less confidently on Southern and Eastern Africa that people are massively reliant on public transport to get around.

    But this rant isn't even about whether Africans rely on public transport or not - it is about the way that people just casually assume that they know something that they are clearly pig ignorant about.

    Do I blame @pakman for making a stupid comment? Yeah I kinda do, but that would not motivate me to spend thirty minutes to write whatever the fuck this rant is. What did motivate me to write this is nicotine withdrawal and the stupid narrative about Africa as a societal and economic blackhole where everything that happens is either due to some white guy coming to save us, political corruption or economic backwardness. It is fucking insulting and has these beliefs have real consequences on how people make long term decisions.

    You've got the wrong end of the stick here, by failing to appreciate the significance of the word relatively.

    Interested to know if you're aware of any African public transport system to rival NYC subway or London Underground in terms of major population density.

    If you've ever been on a bus in Morocco or Kenya you'll know how a sardine feels.

    One got it, all get it.



  • @MiketheSnow said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @pakman said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @pakman

    I woke up in foul mood this morning, so I apologise for my tone...

    Yeah, we are still waiting for the scientist to confirm whether the buffalo I depend on to get to work can be a carrier of covid.

    I can kind of accept that people don't know how Africa operates; I have made the point in this very thread that news coverage of Africa poor. But it still astounds me that someone would make a statement like the below, in thread where the lack of good information is being discussed.

    A relatively low reliance on public transport is likely to be the Continent's get out of jail card, given PT (including air travel) is main conduit for CV transmission
    

    I can't speak as an expert on transport in all of Africa, because you know, I am not a transportation economist and Africa is fucking big place. I was even trying to find a headline figure on how many people depend on public transport in Africa, but again, serious researchers avoid generalising across such a large and diverse area.

    08e4105d-0794-4ea6-a565-46a0cf8f67e8-image.png https://medium.com/impact-engineered/the-african-commute-city-transport-trends-cf369e5106bd

    Do I need to find a reputable research paper to suggest that Africans rely heavily on public transport? For the purposes of an rugby chat forum, probably not. What I can confidently comment on is the situation in South Africa and less confidently on Southern and Eastern Africa that people are massively reliant on public transport to get around.

    But this rant isn't even about whether Africans rely on public transport or not - it is about the way that people just casually assume that they know something that they are clearly pig ignorant about.

    Do I blame @pakman for making a stupid comment? Yeah I kinda do, but that would not motivate me to spend thirty minutes to write whatever the fuck this rant is. What did motivate me to write this is nicotine withdrawal and the stupid narrative about Africa as a societal and economic blackhole where everything that happens is either due to some white guy coming to save us, political corruption or economic backwardness. It is fucking insulting and has these beliefs have real consequences on how people make long term decisions.

    You've got the wrong end of the stick here, by failing to appreciate the significance of the word relatively.

    Interested to know if you're aware of any African public transport system to rival NYC subway or London Underground in terms of major population density.

    If you've ever been on a bus in Morocco or Kenya you'll know how a sardine feels.

    One got it, all get it.

    A bit like trains in India! I think it boils down to the volume of people traveling on public transport daily. In Europe, the areas where public transport volumes are lowest have very low CV numbers. Public transport is the main conduit. Add in air transport hubs and no wonder the big cities in France/Spain/Italy/UK have been hit so hard.



  • @pakman said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @pakman

    I woke up in foul mood this morning, so I apologise for my tone...

    Yeah, we are still waiting for the scientist to confirm whether the buffalo I depend on to get to work can be a carrier of covid.

    I can kind of accept that people don't know how Africa operates; I have made the point in this very thread that news coverage of Africa poor. But it still astounds me that someone would make a statement like the below, in thread where the lack of good information is being discussed.

    A relatively low reliance on public transport is likely to be the Continent's get out of jail card, given PT (including air travel) is main conduit for CV transmission
    

    I can't speak as an expert on transport in all of Africa, because you know, I am not a transportation economist and Africa is fucking big place. I was even trying to find a headline figure on how many people depend on public transport in Africa, but again, serious researchers avoid generalising across such a large and diverse area.

    08e4105d-0794-4ea6-a565-46a0cf8f67e8-image.png https://medium.com/impact-engineered/the-african-commute-city-transport-trends-cf369e5106bd

    Do I need to find a reputable research paper to suggest that Africans rely heavily on public transport? For the purposes of an rugby chat forum, probably not. What I can confidently comment on is the situation in South Africa and less confidently on Southern and Eastern Africa that people are massively reliant on public transport to get around.

    But this rant isn't even about whether Africans rely on public transport or not - it is about the way that people just casually assume that they know something that they are clearly pig ignorant about.

    Do I blame @pakman for making a stupid comment? Yeah I kinda do, but that would not motivate me to spend thirty minutes to write whatever the fuck this rant is. What did motivate me to write this is nicotine withdrawal and the stupid narrative about Africa as a societal and economic blackhole where everything that happens is either due to some white guy coming to save us, political corruption or economic backwardness. It is fucking insulting and has these beliefs have real consequences on how people make long term decisions.

    You've got the wrong end of the stick here, by failing to appreciate the significance of the word relatively.

    Interested to know if you're aware of any African public transport system to rival NYC subway or London Underground in terms of major population density.

    This is not how logic works. I have given evidence (my own experience and a quick google), if you disagree with it, please refute it and we can continue the discussion.

    You are putting a hypothesis forward with zero support expressly stated in your post, which means we need to guess as to what underpins your claim and my guess at that support is rather unflattering.

    I have no issue with you claiming that there is correlation between use of public transport and spread of the virus, it makes sense that it would. If you left it there, it would have been fine (if irrelevant to the topic under discussion). I am not commenting on that part of you comment.

    You said

    A relatively low reliance on public transport is likely to be the Continent's get out of jail card
    

    The claim is not true. You were comfortable making this statement based on god knows what. These sort of statements seem to be fueled by very poor reporting of the continent. Your next comment is a great example what I am referring to.

    A bit like trains in India! I think it boils down to the volume of people traveling on public transport daily. In Europe, the areas where public transport volumes are lowest have very low CV numbers. Public transport is the main conduit. Add in air transport hubs and no wonder the big cities in France/Spain/Italy/UK have been hit so hard.
    

    You are willing to differentiate between urban and rural areas in first world countries, but somehow an entire continent can be dealt with as unitary whole. Its bullshit, lazy and stupid. Stop doing it.



  • @pakman said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    You've got the wrong end of the stick here, by failing to appreciate the significance of the word relatively.

    Interested to know if you're aware of any African public transport system to rival NYC subway or London Underground in terms of major population density.

    You've clearly never seen the matatu system in action. It's basically a game of how many people can you fit in a Toyota Hiace.

    In terms of density, it's easy inline with a lot of the worlds mass transit systems.



  • @MajorRage

    Nairobi - Kenya -

    b4721cb4-55fd-4cb1-bf9d-938113c7163f-image.png

    My Buffalo referred to above - Cape Town South Africa

    alt text



  • @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @pakman said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @SidBarret said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @pakman

    I woke up in foul mood this morning, so I apologise for my tone...

    That is apparent!

    Yeah, we are still waiting for the scientist to confirm whether the buffalo I depend on to get to work can be a carrier of covid.

    I can kind of accept that people don't know how Africa operates; I have made the point in this very thread that news coverage of Africa poor. But it still astounds me that someone would make a statement like the below, in thread where the lack of good information is being discussed.

    A relatively low reliance on public transport is likely to be the Continent's get out of jail card, given PT (including air travel) is main conduit for CV transmission
    

    I can't speak as an expert on transport in all of Africa, because you know, I am not a transportation economist and Africa is fucking big place. I was even trying to find a headline figure on how many people depend on public transport in Africa, but again, serious researchers avoid generalising across such a large and diverse area.

    08e4105d-0794-4ea6-a565-46a0cf8f67e8-image.png https://medium.com/impact-engineered/the-african-commute-city-transport-trends-cf369e5106bd

    Do I need to find a reputable research paper to suggest that Africans rely heavily on public transport? For the purposes of an rugby chat forum, probably not. What I can confidently comment on is the situation in South Africa and less confidently on Southern and Eastern Africa that people are massively reliant on public transport to get around.

    But this rant isn't even about whether Africans rely on public transport or not - it is about the way that people just casually assume that they know something that they are clearly pig ignorant about.

    Do I blame @pakman for making a stupid comment? Yeah I kinda do, but that would not motivate me to spend thirty minutes to write whatever the fuck this rant is. What did motivate me to write this is nicotine withdrawal and the stupid narrative about Africa as a societal and economic blackhole where everything that happens is either due to some white guy coming to save us, political corruption or economic backwardness. It is fucking insulting and has these beliefs have real consequences on how people make long term decisions.

    You've got the wrong end of the stick here, by failing to appreciate the significance of the word relatively.

    Interested to know if you're aware of any African public transport system to rival NYC subway or London Underground in terms of major population density.

    This is not how logic works.

    It's not your logic it's your misunderstanding the meaning of the sentence as whole, of which 'relatively' was an essential component.

    I have given evidence (my own experience and a quick google), if you disagree with it, please refute it and we can continue the discussion.

    You are putting a hypothesis forward with zero support expressly stated in your post, which means we need to guess as to what underpins your claim and my guess at that support is rather unflattering.

    I have no issue with you claiming that there is correlation between use of public transport and spread of the virus, it makes sense that it would. If you left it there, it would have been fine (if irrelevant to the topic under discussion). I am not commenting on that part of you comment.

    You said

    A relatively low reliance on public transport is likely to be the Continent's get out of jail card
    

    The claim is not true. You were comfortable making this statement based on god knows what. These sort of statements seem to be fueled by very poor reporting of the continent.

    I don't know how familiar you are with London or NYC transport, but an enormous volume of people are carried in and around from a quite wide geographical area. It's like a CV superhighway.

    Even Los Angeles relatively is much less reliant on public transport.

    I certainly know that the volume of people traveling on buses in and around Nairobi and Cape Town is massively less than London, NYC, etc.. Can't speak for Lagos and some of the other big cities.

    Your next comment is a great example what I am referring to.

    A bit like trains in India! I think it boils down to the volume of people traveling on public transport daily. In Europe, the areas where public transport volumes are lowest have very low CV numbers. Public transport is the main conduit. Add in air transport hubs and no wonder the big cities in France/Spain/Italy/UK have been hit so hard.
    

    You are willing to differentiate between urban and rural areas in first world countries, but somehow an entire continent can be dealt with as unitary whole. Its bullshit, lazy and stupid. Stop doing it.

    No one said it was a unitary whole. I was making a generalisation, and seeking, albeit not explicitly, to compare with the key Western nations (in Europe and N. America).

    I very much hope the relatively low levels of CV impact across Africa (both urban and rural, whilst acknowledging the differential impacts) continue. Statistics in the US and Western Europe would suggest that black Africans are substantially more susceptible to the virus than Caucasians.

    Latest:

    But early days, and the so far positive stats may just be because of the earlier stage of the pandemic at which African countries are.



  • @SidBarret What's the latest in SA?



  • E9805DBF-9F7E-4F0D-8E3D-1D3BAAC09A69.jpeg
    Dropping to level 3 Monday 1st with last year of junior school and last year high school returning.



  • @mantissanet Those stats are overall right (except for the last one)?



  • @Bones said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    @mantissanet Those stats are overall right (except for the last one)?

    Western Cape jumps out a bit to me, too. Cruise liner visit?



  • Correct... last column daily new cases ...😬

    And no I don’t think cruise liner contributing as far as I’m aware. Hard to say as a layperson why WC so much worse ... and naturally politicians playing ping pong with reasons and blame while people keep getting infected.

    I think we are doing ok considering some very different circumstances to NZ but the elderly and other vulnerable groups are probably looking at more severe permanent changes to their lives than the rest.

    Limited domestic air travel going to be allowed again too and borders still closed. And most importantly ...I can buy BEER again from Monday πŸ»πŸ˜‚



  • @mantissanet said in Coronavirus - South Africa:

    Correct... last column daily new cases ...😬

    And no I don’t think cruise liner contributing as far as I’m aware. Hard to say as a layperson why WC so much worse ... and naturally politicians playing ping pong with reasons and blame while people keep getting infected.

    I think we are doing ok considering some very different circumstances to NZ but the elderly and other vulnerable groups are probably looking at more severe permanent changes to their lives than the rest.

    Limited domestic air travel going to be allowed again too and borders still closed. And most importantly ...I can buy BEER again from Monday πŸ»πŸ˜‚

    Any update?



  • 20FC878D-1208-4C55-8D34-D28AD50533A0.jpeg


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