RIP Dean Jones



  • Passed away after a heart attack in the UAE overnight.



  • Dean Jones has passed away



  • It is with great sadness that we share the news of the passing away of Dean Mervyn Jones AM," Star India, whom Jones was a commentator for, confirmed through a statement. "He died of a sudden cardiac arrest. We express our deep condolences to his family and stand ready to support them in this difficult time.

    Apparently Brett Lee attempted to resuscitate him through CPR



  • @ACT-Crusader said in R.I.P. 2020:

    Dean Jones has passed away

    Wow, that's unexpected and sad



  • Went out for a run, came back to the hotel where he stays and Lee also stays. And he had a heart attack. Brett was there and did CPR. He had been doing commentary in Madras. IPL games on tonight.



  • The Cricket channel here is showing a great sit down interview with Jones. He just shared a great story about Paddles and a match in Auckland.



  • Only 59.. too young.
    Cocky as, that player you loved to hate. One of if not the first ODI best batsmen.



  • @shark Only 59 apparently. That’s way too young.

    What a legend.

    dac76071-c183-422c-8d48-c0064dba960f-image.jpeg



  • Horrendous news. I remember him as a great (annoyingly good) stealer of singles and an elegant shot maker.

    This memory popped up on Cricket.com.au on Monday and was a good laugh about his run in with Curtly Ambrose: https://www.facebook.com/85633169312/posts/10158732127854313/



  • Oh wow.....huge shock. Loving to hate ( but obviously massively respect ) that guy was part and parcel for any young cricket fan growing up. Cocky and with a tremendous record to boot....apparently his double hundred in India was an amazing innings and as @Virgil says he was definitely one of the game changers in how ODIs were played.

    Condolences @NTA and other Aussie cricket fans, you lost a bloody good one.



  • Holy hell. That is a shock.



  • Terrible news. Far too young.

    Condolences to all.

    Repeating what has been said: loved to hate his ability. I seem to recall quite liking him. But hating how he would take us apart.

    RIP



  • @booboo said in RIP Dean Jones:

    Terrible news. Far too young.

    Condolences to all.

    Repeating what has been said: loved to hate his ability. I seem to recall quite liking him. But hating how he would take us apart.

    RIP

    Yeah he seemed pretty likeable and that ‘terrorist’ faux pas was a classic piece of commentary.

    In the Benson and Hedges cup or whatever it was called it was often a case of which Jones went best....we had Andrew who was a pretty damn fine player in his own right.....history tells us than Dean was a far better ODI player overall though.



  • Gee , that is sad ,

    Around the same age as me , I had a long time mate pass away a few weeks ago same age from a heart attack also , with no warnings .

    You just never know what’s around the corner .



  • Too young, awful news.



  • First player to wear sunglasses in the field
    First to truly capitalise on running between the wickets, then emulated by hogan
    First to tear around the boundary taking diving catches regularly
    First to be cancelled for an obvious joke
    Playing Australia in one dayers was all about getting deano out.
    Arrogance with the bat didn't reflect a self effacing personality. His battles with paddles a great example of the difference between on the field and off the field behaviour.

    Always honest, was Deano. A good man



  • https://wisden.com/stories/news-stories/jones-hated-boon-taylor-batting-partners-running

    Why Dean Jones hated batting with David Boon and Mark Taylor

    Dean Jones, the former Australia batsman, speaking on the Lessons Learnt with the Greats podcast, explained how running between the wickets has improved considerably in the modern game, owing to the likes of David Warner who give tremendous importance to fitness.

    Jones, who is credited with revolutionising Australian one-day batting through the Eighties and early Nineties, explained how he found it difficult to press hard for runs in the latter half of a one-day innings, when his batting partners weren’t as eager to cross ends.

    “I hated Boony…David Boon and Mark Taylor for example,” Jones said, “where they batted deep, and I ran their twos and they didn’t run mine. You need to be fit in this level. It’s not hard to get off your backside, stop having the cokes, stop having a couple of beers, to get yourself fit to win a World Cup. So, they got the batting skills and all that, but it really upset me in my time, because I am trying to go hard, hard, hard now I’m in the power [mode] last ten overs, I’m buzz, buzz, buzz…”

    In the modern era where skin folds and time trials act as few of the several parameters to judge a player’s fitness, Jones said that batting skills still hold higher precedence, remarking that “just because a guy is big, doesn’t mean he can’t rip a team apart.” However, he said that running between the wickets has ascended to an amazing level in the current generation, citing Warner an example of an aggressive batsman who puts just as much effort on his big-hitting, as he does for his running between wickets.

    “Now it’s got to an amazing level,” Jones said, “particularly with Warner, his fitness skills are ridiculous and still has the power to hit him big. After a while in T20 matches, you are batting 15 overs and you are still swinging… you are fatigued trying to swing hard. And he’s still got it and he’s still pushing guys for two. And that’s the level we got to get to.

    “You know what? I hate mediocrity. That’s not mediocrity what he’s doing. And it’s just great to watch and if he has to embarrass a few, well, so be it. Because that’s the level we expect as fans to watch, to take the skills to another level.”





  • I believe it was Jones batting with Boon one day at the Adelaide Oval - with the long boundary in place, Jones made him do back to back four-all-run and eventually he chucked on the square.



  • @NTA said in RIP Dean Jones:

    https://wisden.com/stories/news-stories/jones-hated-boon-taylor-batting-partners-running

    Why Dean Jones hated batting with David Boon and Mark Taylor

    Dean Jones, the former Australia batsman, speaking on the Lessons Learnt with the Greats podcast, explained how running between the wickets has improved considerably in the modern game, owing to the likes of David Warner who give tremendous importance to fitness.

    Jones, who is credited with revolutionising Australian one-day batting through the Eighties and early Nineties, explained how he found it difficult to press hard for runs in the latter half of a one-day innings, when his batting partners weren’t as eager to cross ends.

    “I hated Boony…David Boon and Mark Taylor for example,” Jones said, “where they batted deep, and I ran their twos and they didn’t run mine. You need to be fit in this level. It’s not hard to get off your backside, stop having the cokes, stop having a couple of beers, to get yourself fit to win a World Cup. So, they got the batting skills and all that, but it really upset me in my time, because I am trying to go hard, hard, hard now I’m in the power [mode] last ten overs, I’m buzz, buzz, buzz…”

    In the modern era where skin folds and time trials act as few of the several parameters to judge a player’s fitness, Jones said that batting skills still hold higher precedence, remarking that “just because a guy is big, doesn’t mean he can’t rip a team apart.” However, he said that running between the wickets has ascended to an amazing level in the current generation, citing Warner an example of an aggressive batsman who puts just as much effort on his big-hitting, as he does for his running between wickets.

    “Now it’s got to an amazing level,” Jones said, “particularly with Warner, his fitness skills are ridiculous and still has the power to hit him big. After a while in T20 matches, you are batting 15 overs and you are still swinging… you are fatigued trying to swing hard. And he’s still got it and he’s still pushing guys for two. And that’s the level we got to get to.

    “You know what? I hate mediocrity. That’s not mediocrity what he’s doing. And it’s just great to watch and if he has to embarrass a few, well, so be it. Because that’s the level we expect as fans to watch, to take the skills to another level.”

    Shit imagine if he had to bat with Inzy or Ranatunga ?



  • This is the sort of news Victorians don't need right now.

    Dean Jones will go down in history as a person who revolutionised the game. Tremendous to watch him bat. Always felt like if he got a start, Australia were going to win.



  • Easily one of my favourite players of that era, sad to see him pass so young.



  • I couldn't stand him - only because he was good - and didn't play for us.



  • @Donsteppa said in RIP Dean Jones:

    Horrendous news. I remember him as a great (annoyingly good) stealer of singles and an elegant shot maker.

    This memory popped up on Cricket.com.au on Monday and was a good laugh about his run in with Curtly Ambrose: https://www.facebook.com/85633169312/posts/10158732127854313/

    I remember watching that live. I notice Ambrose had his white wristband on again later in the innings.

    RIP Jones.



  • @Snowy said in RIP Dean Jones:

    I couldn't stand him - only because he was good - and didn't play for us.

    I think you could say that about any number of Aussie players to be fair



  • @MN5 Yep.
    He was also a cheeky, lippy type, but you could say that about any number of Aussie players to be fair.



  • unlike most kiwis I loved Dean Jones. I loved what he did for cricket. He was exciting and fucking talented.



  • @mariner4life said in RIP Dean Jones:

    He was exciting and fucking talented.

    No denying that.



  • @Snowy said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @MN5 Yep.
    He was also a cheeky, lippy type, but you could say that about any number of Aussie players to be fair.

    We’re being pretty fair



  • @mariner4life said in RIP Dean Jones:

    unlike most kiwis I loved Dean Jones. I loved what he did for cricket. He was exciting and fucking talented.

    He was consulting for the Black Caps during some of the purple patch between 01-04 and was really well regarded. If you had to have an Aussie influence on the side he would be one of the better ones for sure.

    Always enjoyed his humour and enthusiasm. Tied test innings is the stuff of legends.



  • @MN5 said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @Snowy said in RIP Dean Jones:

    I couldn't stand him - only because he was good - and didn't play for us.

    I think you could say that about any number of Aussie players to be fair

    This is true for most, but I liked Dean Jones. Maybe because he was Victorian and as I grew up I would watch SS with the old man. Jones was a competitor that in my opinion didn’t come across as arrogant like some of the other players.

    I couldn’t stand Merv Hughes though and him and Jones were best mates until they had a massive falling out. That friendship never really recovered.



  • Jones was pretty much done by the time I started following cricket around 1991/92, but I was certainly aware of his stature in the game. As others have said, he helped revolutionize the ODI format, but he also played some notable test innings.



  • @shark said in RIP Dean Jones:

    Jones was pretty much done by the time I started following cricket around 1991/92, but I was certainly aware of his stature in the game. As others have said, he helped revolutionize the ODI format, but he also played some notable test innings.

    Yeah good point. Sure, 10 years later Oz had class batsmen coming out of their ears but I note he finished test cricket in 1992. Surely he had years left in him ?



  • Annoyed the bejezus out of me with all those very narrow not out calls going his way on runout appeals before the introduction of TMO slow motion replays. Having said that he sure was very quick between the wickets.



  • @rotated said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @mariner4life said in RIP Dean Jones:

    unlike most kiwis I loved Dean Jones. I loved what he did for cricket. He was exciting and fucking talented.

    He was consulting for the Black Caps during some of the purple patch between 01-04 and was really well regarded. If you had to have an Aussie influence on the side he would be one of the better ones for sure.

    Always enjoyed his humour and enthusiasm. Tied test innings is the stuff of legends.

    Interestingly I would be curious to see how many kiwis would hate Dean Jones. Sure, there were a few aussie traits that would annoy some, but he was never really in the most hated column unlike some of his colleagues (I would have thought). Annoyingly enthusiastic which is an amazingly positive trait, helped NZ cricket as you mention and was a funny guy.

    Sad loss for cricket community



  • @MN5 said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @shark said in RIP Dean Jones:

    Jones was pretty much done by the time I started following cricket around 1991/92, but I was certainly aware of his stature in the game. As others have said, he helped revolutionize the ODI format, but he also played some notable test innings.

    Yeah good point. Sure, 10 years later Oz had class batsmen coming out of their ears but I note he finished test cricket in 1992. Surely he had years left in him ?

    Just had a look at the end of his test career and his dropping was slightly odd timing.

    He had a definite lean patch, starting with a 1990 test against us and ending with a 150* vs India. Averaged 26 over quite a few test innings.

    They then took him to Sri Lanka and he was like a pig in shit - his last 7 test innings he averaged 85 (including that 150*). And then they dropped him.

    I guess they thought he wasn't the man for a West Indies series - and they replaced him with Damien Martyn or Steve Waugh.



  • @Chris-B said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @MN5 said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @shark said in RIP Dean Jones:

    Jones was pretty much done by the time I started following cricket around 1991/92, but I was certainly aware of his stature in the game. As others have said, he helped revolutionize the ODI format, but he also played some notable test innings.

    Yeah good point. Sure, 10 years later Oz had class batsmen coming out of their ears but I note he finished test cricket in 1992. Surely he had years left in him ?

    Just had a look at the end of his test career and his dropping was slightly odd timing.

    He had a definite lean patch, starting with a 1990 test against us and ending with a 150* vs India. Averaged 26 over quite a few test innings.

    They then took him to Sri Lanka and he was like a pig in shit - his last 7 test innings he averaged 85 (including that 150*). And then they dropped him.

    I guess they thought he wasn't the man for a West Indies series - and they replaced him with Damien Martyn or Steve Waugh.

    Justin Langer emerged and batted at three as well from memory. Plus the fatties he didn’t like running with were still in and around the team too.



  • @MN5 said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @shark said in RIP Dean Jones:

    Jones was pretty much done by the time I started following cricket around 1991/92, but I was certainly aware of his stature in the game. As others have said, he helped revolutionize the ODI format, but he also played some notable test innings.

    Yeah good point. Sure, 10 years later Oz had class batsmen coming out of their ears but I note he finished test cricket in 1992. Surely he had years left in him ?

    I recall it was a bit controversial given his excellent record against the Windies. I think I read he was a very outspoken and abbrasive fella and only a slight dip in form was enough to get him axed.

    He was an absolute super star in Aus in the late 80s. Recall the Deano shirts. Him and Marsh were an excellent combo in one dayers for a long time.



  • @Rancid-Schnitzel said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @MN5 said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @shark said in RIP Dean Jones:

    Jones was pretty much done by the time I started following cricket around 1991/92, but I was certainly aware of his stature in the game. As others have said, he helped revolutionize the ODI format, but he also played some notable test innings.

    Yeah good point. Sure, 10 years later Oz had class batsmen coming out of their ears but I note he finished test cricket in 1992. Surely he had years left in him ?

    I recall it was a bit controversial given his excellent record against the Windies. I think I read he was a very outspoken and abbrasive fella and only a slight dip in form was enough to get him axed.

    He was an absolute super star in Aus in the late 80s. Recall the Deano shirts. Him and Marsh were an excellent combo in one dayers for a long time.

    I’d imagine telling a stalwart like Boonie to cut drinking so much and run a bit more would have gone down like a bucket of cold chunder as well



  • @MN5 said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @Chris-B said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @MN5 said in RIP Dean Jones:

    @shark said in RIP Dean Jones:

    Jones was pretty much done by the time I started following cricket around 1991/92, but I was certainly aware of his stature in the game. As others have said, he helped revolutionize the ODI format, but he also played some notable test innings.

    Yeah good point. Sure, 10 years later Oz had class batsmen coming out of their ears but I note he finished test cricket in 1992. Surely he had years left in him ?

    Just had a look at the end of his test career and his dropping was slightly odd timing.

    He had a definite lean patch, starting with a 1990 test against us and ending with a 150* vs India. Averaged 26 over quite a few test innings.

    They then took him to Sri Lanka and he was like a pig in shit - his last 7 test innings he averaged 85 (including that 150*). And then they dropped him.

    I guess they thought he wasn't the man for a West Indies series - and they replaced him with Damien Martyn or Steve Waugh.

    Justin Langer emerged and batted at three as well from memory. Plus the fatties he didn’t like running with were still in and around the team too.

    It was totally unexpected his dropping given what he had been doing. But the OZ selectors were wanting Damian Martyn’s place in the test side solidified and Jones was the causality.


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