Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff



  • @Crucial @Hooroo

    I have also made lemon posset, slightly different in technique in that I boil the cream with the sugar and add the lemon juice then allow to cool. It is quite surprising to see how the lemon juice instantly thickens the cream. It is very easy and really tasty. Try adding a drop or two of sherry to make into a syllabub.



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @nzzp said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff: Boy have you had a day!

    Hell yeah. Midway party baby. Showing the kids Karate Kid - the original, not the aberration with Jaden Smith



  • @nzzp said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @nzzp said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff: Boy have you had a day!

    Hell yeah. Midway party baby. Showing the kids Karate Kid - the original, not the aberration with Jaden Smith

    Hows that going? I made my kids watch that about a year ago, and it was a bit painful TBH. Slow moving, pretty dated, could feel the kids boredom - I was really disappointed !



  • @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Ended up doing this tonight - on a bit of an Asian kick since the Asian supermarket is still open and the dishes work with lesser cuts or just straight less meat.

    Was pretty tasty, we have some crazy asian chilli oil which had me sweating into my bowl

    https://redhousespice.com/dan-dan-noodles/

    Dude! That looks fabulous! I love Asian food and especially spicy Asian food. Did you get your hands on all those ingredient? Black Rice vinegar???

    I did, and I actually have you to thank for it - because right next to the (closed) Neat Meats that you sent me to, is the Asian grocer who remains open! I spent 15mins in there trying to find what I needed for this recipe and the sichaun beef one, and was a solid 5 things short And thinking the dream was over, until the owner bloke came to help me and found what I was missing in 45 seconds (all labelled in Chinese).

    So thanks! 👍😁👍

    Ha! Perfect!! Fern to rescue again, albeit by fluke.

    This thread is be far my favourite at the moment. So many inspiring dishes.

    It's awesome eh, even for a basic bugger like me. Just about to start on a chutney after @taniwharugby mentioned it. You mentioned brisket, I have one sitting in brine in the fridge ready for this weekend with homemade sauerkraut and crusty bread.



  • @Catogrande said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Crucial @Hooroo

    I have also made lemon posset, slightly different in technique in that I boil the cream with the sugar and add the lemon juice then allow to cool. It is quite surprising to see how the lemon juice instantly thickens the cream. It is very easy and really tasty. Try adding a drop or two of sherry to make into a syllabub.

    I read that dissolving the sugar in the lemon made a smoother result. Probably less chance of being grainy. Have no proof.



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @nzzp said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @nzzp said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff: Boy have you had a day!

    Hell yeah. Midway party baby. Showing the kids Karate Kid - the original, not the aberration with Jaden Smith

    Hows that going? I made my kids watch that about a year ago, and it was a bit painful TBH. Slow moving, pretty dated, could feel the kids boredom - I was really disappointed !

    Better than I expected actually. They're pretty engrosssed. The threshold is low though.. they don't watch a massive amount of modern movies.



  • @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Crucial, can I sub in limes for lemon? Our lime tree is full of fruit

    It may have just been a seasonal thing when I was in NZ at Xmas, but a tree full of limes would have a street value of about 42,000,000 NZD.



  • @nzzp at the risk of taking over the food thread, my 3 kids (11, 9 and 6) have been absolutely enthralled by the Hunger Games during lockdown. Multiple viewings for all, books for the older ones. Been great.



  • @Bones said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Ended up doing this tonight - on a bit of an Asian kick since the Asian supermarket is still open and the dishes work with lesser cuts or just straight less meat.

    Was pretty tasty, we have some crazy asian chilli oil which had me sweating into my bowl

    https://redhousespice.com/dan-dan-noodles/

    Dude! That looks fabulous! I love Asian food and especially spicy Asian food. Did you get your hands on all those ingredient? Black Rice vinegar???

    I did, and I actually have you to thank for it - because right next to the (closed) Neat Meats that you sent me to, is the Asian grocer who remains open! I spent 15mins in there trying to find what I needed for this recipe and the sichaun beef one, and was a solid 5 things short And thinking the dream was over, until the owner bloke came to help me and found what I was missing in 45 seconds (all labelled in Chinese).

    So thanks! 👍😁👍

    Ha! Perfect!! Fern to rescue again, albeit by fluke.

    This thread is be far my favourite at the moment. So many inspiring dishes.

    It's awesome eh, even for a basic bugger like me. Just about to start on a chutney after @taniwharugby mentioned it. You mentioned brisket, I have one sitting in brine in the fridge ready for this weekend with homemade sauerkraut and crusty bread.

    This doesn't fully absolve you from your apple butter debacle, but its a start.



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Ended up doing this tonight - on a bit of an Asian kick since the Asian supermarket is still open and the dishes work with lesser cuts or just straight less meat.

    Was pretty tasty, we have some crazy asian chilli oil which had me sweating into my bowl

    https://redhousespice.com/dan-dan-noodles/

    Dude! That looks fabulous! I love Asian food and especially spicy Asian food. Did you get your hands on all those ingredient? Black Rice vinegar???

    I did, and I actually have you to thank for it - because right next to the (closed) Neat Meats that you sent me to, is the Asian grocer who remains open! I spent 15mins in there trying to find what I needed for this recipe and the sichaun beef one, and was a solid 5 things short And thinking the dream was over, until the owner bloke came to help me and found what I was missing in 45 seconds (all labelled in Chinese).

    So thanks! 👍😁👍

    Ha! Perfect!! Fern to rescue again, albeit by fluke.

    This thread is be far my favourite at the moment. So many inspiring dishes.

    It's awesome eh, even for a basic bugger like me. Just about to start on a chutney after @taniwharugby mentioned it. You mentioned brisket, I have one sitting in brine in the fridge ready for this weekend with homemade sauerkraut and crusty bread.

    This doesn't fully absolve you from your apple butter debacle, but its a start.

    Fucken hell, first @R-L and now you. I'm not the origin of the apple butter on this thread...



  • @Crucial Sort of makes sense, I'll give it a try next time.



  • @MajorRage said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Crucial, can I sub in limes for lemon? Our lime tree is full of fruit

    It may have just been a seasonal thing when I was in NZ at Xmas, but a tree full of limes would have a street value of about 42,000,000 NZD.

    I can never understand why lines and commercially grown in NZ and we pay a fortune for imports. Even in Wellington weather have a tree growing in a pot that produces ok. Other folk I know have well established trees that produce more than they can use.



  • So last nights third of a brisket turned out marvellous. I also did the potatoes as others have done but a squeeze a lemon over them once cool too. Then into beef dripping.

    That with steamed beans made for a lovely dinner. Sauce was banging too but I didn’t take photo.

    BFB32012-E36B-422C-A37E-3E72261620BC.jpeg FDDCA274-B177-4E24-A303-1D9A9A32EBDE.jpeg



  • @Hooroo Trying not to sound critical, but shouldn't all that fat have rendered down during the cook? To be fair it's a big old fat cap though.



  • @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo Trying not to sound critical, but shouldn't all that fat have rendered down during the cook? To be fair it's a big old fat cap though.

    No, Usually if doing on a smoker for all those hours, you would trim away the majority of this fat



  • @Hooroo So you just left it on?



  • @Crucial I had so many over summer they ended up being left and pretty much turned into lemons haha

    which is good cos my lemon tree didnt produce much, grapefruit has alot of fruit this year waiting to ripen, loves me some grapefruit juice!



  • @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo So you just left it on?

    Yes, bearing in mind that this was cur into thirds in the end and done in slowcooker with a homemade BBQ sauce. I am going to do the low and slow thing with a whole brisket on Sunday or maybe Monday.



  • @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo So you just left it on?

    Yes, bearing in mind that this was cur into thirds in the end and done in slowcooker with a homemade BBQ sauce. I am going to do the low and slow thing with a whole brisket on Sunday or maybe Monday.

    Ahhh gotcha! Sorry, I thought for some reason you were smoking it and thought it was an odd result! Can't wait to see how the whole brisket looks.



  • By the way, I'm currently savouring the aroma coming off a beef cheek rendang in my slow cooker. One of my absolute favourites. I love slow-cooked beef cheeks fullstop, but with rendang sauce (yes, a sauce as opposed to a dry rendang because my family needs the coconut cream to dilute the heat a bit) they're sublime.



  • @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    By the way, I'm currently savouring the aroma coming off a beef cheek rendang in my slow cooker. One of my absolute favourites. I love slow-cooked beef cheeks fullstop, but with rendang sauce (yes, a sauce as opposed to a dry rendang because my family needs the coconut cream to dilute the heat a bit) they're sublime.

    Recipe please!



  • I've got my cheat's pastrami on deck today. Quite curious to see how it turns out

    20200409_121945.jpg



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    By the way, I'm currently savouring the aroma coming off a beef cheek rendang in my slow cooker. One of my absolute favourites. I love slow-cooked beef cheeks fullstop, but with rendang sauce (yes, a sauce as opposed to a dry rendang because my family needs the coconut cream to dilute the heat a bit) they're sublime.

    Recipe please!

    I use a paste. It's more method than recipe. I find with any recognised curry paste it's not worth the effort to make them when delicious commercial versions are available. Bit different if making something you can't buy pre-made by a good brand. The best rendang paste I've used is Ayam (jar) but the one on at the moment is Indofood (packet) and at this stage (reducing) it doesn't have the same punch, or coconut hit so I might add some dessicated coconut.

    Making a rendang this way is piss-easy. I get two large beef cheeks and either cut into thirds each, or if particularly large I'll quarter them. Pre-heat a slow cooker on high and once hot add the paste. Once fragrant, add the cheeks and turn down to low. Add coconut cream to cover and cook for up to 24 hours, or until the cheeks threaten to break apart when you move them. At this point take them out and allow to cool. Reduce the sauce by half in a pot and then slow to a low temp and around 15 minutes prior to serving add the cheeks back in to gently reheat. Serve over / next to white jasmine rice (could be coconut rice, with some chopped coriander through it for colour) and steamed green beans. Garnish with sliced toasted almonds and a little more coriander, if you're not a hater.

    The best bit about this is the leftovers. The more you re-heat this dish the better it seems to get! Keep the rice separate though or it'll get all claggy, re-heat in the work cafeteria microwave and wait for your co-workers to start salivating!



  • @shark i agree about the quality of the store bought options but I almost always make my own pastes. I genuinely find spending a couple of hours peeling, chopping and pounding away with the pestle and mortar immensely satisfying and quite cathartic.

    My rendang paste has about 15 ingredients. Probably doesn't taste that different to Ayam's but I just love the whole process.



  • @canefan said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    I've got my cheat's pastrami on deck today. Quite curious to see how it turns out

    20200409_121945.jpg

    You've got them on the wrong side of the lid...…

    😛



  • Oh and I will have to try it with beef cheeks. Loooove beef cheeks



  • @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @canefan said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    I've got my cheat's pastrami on deck today. Quite curious to see how it turns out

    20200409_121945.jpg

    You've got them on the wrong side of the lid...…

    😛

    Wow thanks for letting me know!

    20200409_141558.jpg



  • A little addition to the roast spuds discussion.

    I use @MajorRage method and, yes, canola / rapeseed oil - throw in some raw polenta grains at the shaking stage. Extra crunchy crust. Done this way spuds have become a family favourite and I am told (not asked) to add polenta every time now.

    Those of you with the mash versing (@booboo ) roast discussion - I also have to do both these days. Difficult bastards all over the place it seems.



  • @dogmeat said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @shark i agree about the quality of the store bought options but I almost always make my own pastes. I genuinely find spending a couple of hours peeling, chopping and pounding away with the pestle and mortar immensely satisfying and quite cathartic.

    My rendang paste has about 15 ingredients. Probably doesn't taste that different to Ayam's but I just love the whole process.

    I generally love the prep side of cooking; it really relaxes me. But one thing I can't stand is using a pestle and mortar, and I also despise having to get out, set up, clean and put away a food processor for the sake of a paste. Any amount of chopping, stirring, folding, blending, trimming etc etc is all good, but no thanks to the aforementioned two 🙂



  • @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @dogmeat said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @shark i agree about the quality of the store bought options but I almost always make my own pastes. I genuinely find spending a couple of hours peeling, chopping and pounding away with the pestle and mortar immensely satisfying and quite cathartic.

    My rendang paste has about 15 ingredients. Probably doesn't taste that different to Ayam's but I just love the whole process.

    I generally love the prep side of cooking; it really relaxes me. But one thing I can't stand is using a pestle and mortar, and I also despise having to get out, set up, clean and put away a food processor for the sake of a paste. Any amount of chopping, stirring, folding, blending, trimming etc etc is all good, but no thanks to the aforementioned two 🙂

    I love a smash about in a P&M! Mine is quite large though so can really get amongst.

    I think I like doing these sorts of things like blitzing a paste if I have grown the ingredients myself. I have hundreds of chillies that I don't know what to do with so am always looking for a recipe for them



  • @Hooroo I'm the guy who puts chilli in / hot sauce on pretty much anything it'll work with 🙂 Feel free to freeze a bunch and courier to me when we're post-lockdown and I'll whip up some chilli jam and stuff!



  • @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo I'm the guy who puts chilli in / hot sauce on pretty much anything it'll work with 🙂 Feel free to freeze a bunch and courier to me when we're post-lockdown and I'll whip up some chilli jam and stuff!

    I promised some to @taniwharugby too but realise I don't have courier bags at home. Will definitely send a bunch down your way. They travel well fresh.



  • @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    pretty much anything it'll work with

    er, it works with pretty much anything!



  • When in Indonesia on the way back to NZ I went to a cooking class from a guy in his local warung to learn various paste mixes and how to try and get that same taste as the local food. He had set up to get you hands on grinding the ingredients by hand then cooking something with them. No doubt @voodoo has seen these, but I'd love to get my hands on one in NZ

    alt text

    Works way better than a European style pestle and mortar. The rougher granite makes quick work and the shaped pestle is comfortable in the hand.

    The ones he had were bigger as well so you could really get going on them without flicking everything out the side.



  • i made beef cheeks for the first time about a month ago, fuck they were good. Real simple braising liquid and it was ace. So soft, and so rich.



  • @Crucial said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    When in Indonesia on the way back to NZ I went to a cooking class from a guy in his local warung to learn various paste mixes and how to try and get that same taste as the local food. He had set up to get you hands on grinding the ingredients by hand then cooking something with them. No doubt @voodoo has seen these, but I'd love to get my hands on one in NZ

    alt text

    Works way better than a European style pestle and mortar. The rougher granite makes quick work and the shaped pestle is comfortable in the hand.

    The ones he had were bigger as well so you could really get going on them without flicking everything out the side

    I love mine! It big and coarse but I like the look of the picture of that. 47283D1F-F67A-4F88-964D-6926AD159990.jpeg 6F464940-EC7E-46BF-9F63-6497AFF47FAF.jpeg

    I put my hand on the board for size reference.



  • @Crucial I can't find your fucking Lemon cream recipe thing on here!!! Did you delete/? If not can you quote the post and tag me in?

    Otherwise there are promises I can't fulfil!! 🙂

    Holding a bag of limes scrolling through this damn thread



  • This post is deleted!


  • Good news everyone! My wife found that little local supermarket here in QT, and sent me there to get meals for the next fee days. It's a bit light on many things, but when rummaging around the meat section (with my eyes of course), I found this little beauty! Dunno why they stole the bone out of it, but beggars can't be choosers!

    I've done it the Greek way with stuff I had, garlic, rosemary and lemons.

    Roll on 8.30pm!

    JPEG_20200409_160748_compress72.jpg



  • @Crucial said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Crucial said in Lockdown Check In:

    BTW it isn't me posting pictures of buttery, glazed croissants or slow cooked shoulders.

    I have been eating quite healthily (so far). Snacks to a minimum. Basing meals around whatever fresh veg needs eating up so as not to waste anything... got to make up for the extra beer consumption some how.

    There was one piggy item produced the other day, more as an experiment on technique but it was bloody nice. Will move over to the food thread with the recipe....

    to continue this without thread diverging too much.

    Was clearing through some stuff and found a receipt for a meal about a year ago in Cornwall. I'm not often a dessert eater but was talked into having a 'Lemon Posset' which was delicious. Have always meant to check how it is made as it is basically a very silky, set mixture of lemon juice and cream with no stabiliser like flour or gelatine. I thought it may be quite tricky due to the mixture of cream and acid but was surprisingly easy and looked in no danger of curdling.

    Now for the heart attack in a small package - this will only make two small desserts

    300ml double cream (I used Lewis Road) 90g Caster Sugar 100ml freshly squeezed lemon juice Zest of one lemon

    In one pot bring cream and zest slowly to the boil - careful as it will boil over easily At the same time heat lemon juice and sugar together to dissolve sugar completely. Just a simple syrup, don't overheat. Add one to the other and hold just above simmer for a few minutes (probably depends on pot size/surface area) to reduce by about a quarter. Pour through fine sieve into jug to remove zest then pour into serving containers - they only need to be about 150-175 ml so a small ramekin, glass, jar or teacup will work. Leave aside to cool before covering and putting in fridge to set. Berries on top (Blueberries go nice)

    So kind of like very sweet and lemony reduced cream.

    FOUND IT!!!


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