Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff



  • @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Crucial said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    When in Indonesia on the way back to NZ I went to a cooking class from a guy in his local warung to learn various paste mixes and how to try and get that same taste as the local food.
    He had set up to get you hands on grinding the ingredients by hand then cooking something with them.
    No doubt @voodoo has seen these, but I'd love to get my hands on one in NZ

    alt text

    Works way better than a European style pestle and mortar.
    The rougher granite makes quick work and the shaped pestle is comfortable in the hand.

    The ones he had were bigger as well so you could really get going on them without flicking everything out the side

    I love mine! It big and coarse but I like the look of the picture of that. 47283D1F-F67A-4F88-964D-6926AD159990.jpeg 6F464940-EC7E-46BF-9F63-6497AFF47FAF.jpeg

    I put my hand on the board for size reference.

    Bro I've seen your hand holding a beer on facebook. That as a reference point does not help much except that is possibly a toilet sized mortar.



  • @Bones how's that Apple butter coming bro?



  • @mariner4life said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    i made beef cheeks for the first time about a month ago, fuck they were good. Real simple braising liquid and it was ace. So soft, and so rich.

    Whenever I get a chance (i.e. I'm the only one that will eat it) I do this fucking simple but delicious one from good old Gordo.
    https://charinthekitchen.com/2018/07/29/gordon-ramsays-slow-braised-beef-cheeks-with-pappardelle/

    Edit: I often just have it with mash and greens though. Makes good pie filling too.

    Oh and spuds - my ma always used to do roast and mash with a roast dinner. That's my "treat" roast once every couple of months now.



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones how's that Apple butter coming bro?

    Still waiting for the cow to finish all the apples and haven't managed to line up one of those fairground whirly-gig things for spinning the cow from the carnies because of covid.



  • @Bones said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones how's that Apple butter coming bro?

    Still waiting for the cow to finish all the apples and haven't managed to line up one of those fairground whirly-gig things for spinning the cow from the carnies because of covid.

    I've said it before and I'll say it again

    Good things take time



  • That reminds me ... if anybody is feeling overly lardy and indulgent, try making roasted smashed potatoes ..

    Basically par boil them til they are falling apart, drain, then add shit loads of oil (canola for me as above), loads of salt and pepper, then shake the shit out of the pot. Pour onto the roasting tray and the smaller bits, squeeze into balls.

    Then roast is normal. AT the end you get something that is probably 50% fat, but jesus it's awesome.



  • @Bones said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Crucial said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    When in Indonesia on the way back to NZ I went to a cooking class from a guy in his local warung to learn various paste mixes and how to try and get that same taste as the local food.
    He had set up to get you hands on grinding the ingredients by hand then cooking something with them.
    No doubt @voodoo has seen these, but I'd love to get my hands on one in NZ

    alt text

    Works way better than a European style pestle and mortar.
    The rougher granite makes quick work and the shaped pestle is comfortable in the hand.

    The ones he had were bigger as well so you could really get going on them without flicking everything out the side

    I love mine! It big and coarse but I like the look of the picture of that. 47283D1F-F67A-4F88-964D-6926AD159990.jpeg 6F464940-EC7E-46BF-9F63-6497AFF47FAF.jpeg

    I put my hand on the board for size reference.

    Bro I've seen your hand holding a beer on facebook. That as a reference point does not help much except that is possibly a toilet sized mortar.

    Fuck that made me laugh



  • @MajorRage also reminds me of this I stumbled on the other day. S'funny the simple things that I don't even think of that would make something yum.
    https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/smashed-roasties



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones how's that Apple butter coming bro?

    Still waiting for the cow to finish all the apples and haven't managed to line up one of those fairground whirly-gig things for spinning the cow from the carnies because of covid.

    I've said it before and I'll say it again

    Good things take time

    alt text



  • @MajorRage said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    That reminds me ... if anybody is feeling overly lardy and indulgent, try making roasted smashed potatoes ..

    Basically par boil them til they are falling apart, drain, then add shit loads of oil (canola for me as above), loads of salt and pepper, then shake the shit out of the pot. Pour onto the roasting tray and the smaller bits, squeeze into balls.

    Then roast is normal. AT the end you get something that is probably 50% fat, but jesus it's awesome.

    Done that. It's unreal. And you get a great mix of texture



  • @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Good news everyone! My wife found that little local supermarket here in QT, and sent me there to get meals for the next fee days. It's a bit light on many things, but when rummaging around the meat section (with my eyes of course), I found this little beauty! Dunno why they stole the bone out of it, but beggars can't be choosers!

    I've done it the Greek way with stuff I had, garlic, rosemary and lemons.

    Roll on 8.30pm!

    JPEG_20200409_160748_compress72.jpg

    After shot too please. Looks fantastic already.

    Ok, here we go:

    20200409_202647.jpg 20200409_202122_1586421410901.jpg

    Dinner for 1 = no need for non-potato veggies...



  • @voodoo I like the bottom more traditional plating method!



  • I know the following is pretty basic stuff, but perhaps something easier some might enjoy! Some regulars for us...

    Cajun Chicken Gumbo
    https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/cajun-chicken-gumbo

    Sauerkraut Soup (I don't quite follow the ingredients to the letter but pretty similar)
    Ingredients
    1 pound smoked sausage, such as kielbasa, diced
    1 large onion, finely chopped
    1 rib celery, finely chopped
    1 tablespoon minced garlic
    1 cup hard cider
    1 (32-ounce) jar sauerkraut, drained and rinsed briefly
    8 cups canned low-sodium chicken broth
    1 cup peeled and cubed potatoes
    3 sprigs fresh thyme
    1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    Directions
    Heat a large soup pot over medium-high heat and add the sausage. Cook until the sausage is caramelized and the fat is rendered, 4 to 6 minutes. Add the onions and celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are soft and lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the cider and cook until almost completely reduced. Add the sauerkraut, broth, potatoes, thyme and pepper and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a low simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until potatoes and sauerkraut are very tender and the broth is flavorful, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Taste and adjust the seasoning, if necessary. Serve immediately, with hot, crusty bread on the side.

    Slow Cooker Steak Soup
    Ingredients
    1kg Casserole Steak (take your pick)
    1/4 cup of flour
    1tspn salt
    1 packet Maggi French Soup mix (or similar)
    1 Onion (sliced)
    2tbspn tomato paste
    1tbspn worcestershire
    1 litre beef stock
    2tbspn "crushed-ish" peppercorns
    1 cup pasta (Conchiglie, Ditalini, Penne work well)

    In a slow cooker, toss the beef, flour and salt until beef is covered.
    Add the soup mix, onion, paste, worcestershire, stock and peppercorns and mix.
    Cover and cook on low for 8 hours.
    Cook the pasta as required and throw in the soup for 20 minutes before serving (we often just leave the pasta out).



  • @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Wow. Lime works!!! Really well. Thanks @Crucial this is easily made and tastes sooooo good.

    BF84D252-4E41-4049-9551-46CA5F4B3A2A.jpeg EF08A68B-804F-4F8B-89A0-D0C32E89F26A.jpeg

    A little cheffie trick to get rid of those bubbles is to just run a blow torch over the top quickly before cooling.
    Other than that they look awesome.



  • @Crucial said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Hooroo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Wow. Lime works!!! Really well. Thanks @Crucial this is easily made and tastes sooooo good.

    BF84D252-4E41-4049-9551-46CA5F4B3A2A.jpeg EF08A68B-804F-4F8B-89A0-D0C32E89F26A.jpeg

    A little cheffie trick to get rid of those bubbles is to just run a blow torch over the top quickly before cooling.
    Other than that they look awesome.

    The bubbles are there for rustic homemade purposes! 🙂

    Great tip, cheers. Will try and remember that as we have a blow torch for brulee etc.



  • OK, so daughter No1 came through and we had a really nice lamb tagine, spicy and full of flavour but without excessive heat. Could have done with some fruit in it but on the whole very good. She also baked some form of half leavened bread which she put some chilli oil into the mix. Fantastic result and complimented the tagine wonderfully.

    No pictures I'm afraid as it just looked like a brown mess.

    I had a glass or two of Chateau Peuch-Haut, Tete de Belier 2015 with it, which stood up to the spice very well. Now I have to think of something for tomorrow that will also suit the wine as only half a bottle went due to Mrs Cato being on a lenten eschewment of alcohol. Sort of a detox and sort of a lose weight thing but in truth she'd be better off foregoing chocolate for the latter.

    No, I have not pointed that out.I may be a fool but I ain't no suicide.



  • @Catogrande said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    OK, so daughter No1 came through and we had a really nice lamb tagine, spicy and full of flavour but without excessive heat. Could have done with some fruit in it but on the whole very good. She also baked some form of half leavened bread which she put some chilli oil into the mix. Fantastic result and complimented the tagine wonderfully.

    No pictures I'm afraid as it just looked like a brown mess.

    I had a glass or two of Chateau Peuch-Haut, Tete de Belier 2015 with it, which stood up to the spice very well. Now I have to think of something for tomorrow that will also suit the wine as only half a bottle went due to Mrs Cato being on a lenten eschewment of alcohol. Sort of a detox and sort of a lose weight thing but in truth she'd be better off foregoing chocolate for the latter.

    No, I have not pointed that out.I may be a fool but I ain't no suicide.

    I liked your entire post but apart from lemon and lime, I hate hot savoury fruit



  • @Hooroo I can't stand sweet with the meat.



  • @MajorRage said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Thats a great tip!! How much polenta out of interest? With say enough roast spuds for a family of 4

    Late reply, but about 1/2 cup for 6-8 large spuds. You will need more spuds than that, they always get eaten - I will even reheat or have cold the next day as long as they are taken out of the oil and drained when hot. Add more polenta if needed to make sure the spuds are coated. If you can't get it all to stick just sprinkle it over top of spuds before going into the oven. If you have the hot oil on them it will stick then.

    I worked in Jo Seagar's restaurant for years when in my teens, was one of many cooking tips that she used. Think it is in one of her books.



  • @Bones @Hooroo

    I hear you guys and mostly would agree. I'm not usually one for having my pudding on the same plate as my main course, but a bit of slow simmered dried fruit in a tagine does go remarkably well. For me, dried apricots are best and in general I really do not like apricots so that's a bit strange really. The only other time I enjoy fruit with meat is in a stuffing and then only with pork or lamb.



  • @Catogrande said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones @Hooroo

    I hear you guys and mostly would agree. I'm not usually one for having my pudding on the same plate as my main course, but a bit of slow simmered dried fruit in a tagine does go remarkably well. For me, dried apricots are best and in general I really do not like apricots so that's a bit strange really. The only other time I enjoy fruit with meat is in a stuffing and then only with pork or lamb.

    Yep, same same - that vegetable tagine I made last week had some apricots in it, was good. No meat though.

    I also hate fruits in salads, though appreciate I'm not in the majority there. Can't stand apples and pears and sultanas appearing with my greens.



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Catogrande said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones @Hooroo

    I hear you guys and mostly would agree. I'm not usually one for having my pudding on the same plate as my main course, but a bit of slow simmered dried fruit in a tagine does go remarkably well. For me, dried apricots are best and in general I really do not like apricots so that's a bit strange really. The only other time I enjoy fruit with meat is in a stuffing and then only with pork or lamb.

    Yep, same same - that vegetable tagine I made last week had some apricots in it, was good. No meat though.

    I also hate fruits in salads, though appreciate I'm not in the majority there. Can't stand apples and pears and sultanas appearing with my greens.

    You know where you can stick your vege Tangine, @voodoo 🙂



  • Sweet with meat is a winner, we've talked about this before guys don't waste thread on it.

    On my Watermelon Gin tonight again, woooosh it's good, it's Thursday but it's my Friday. I've made creamy cheese filled salmon fishcakes for tomorrow, simple, fecking messy but simple and plan on making veggie pizzas for lunch with my girl. Got to be a good Catholic for the day so no meat. So booze tonight YEAH!!??!



  • Pineapple Lump marshmallow Easter Eggs!



  • @R-L said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Sweet with meat is a winner, we've talked about this before guys don't waste thread on it.

    On my Watermelon Gin tonight again, woooosh it's good, it's Thursday but it's my Friday. I've made creamy cheese filled salmon fishcakes for tomorrow, simple, fecking messy but simple and plan on making veggie pizzas for lunch with my girl. Got to be a good Catholic for the day so no meat. So booze tonight YEAH!!??!

    Is that last bit a question?... I think the answer is the right one...

    We regularly make pizzas here too, generally on a Friday, not sure I could go vege only tho, tho miss 7 does...



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Catogrande said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones @Hooroo

    I hear you guys and mostly would agree. I'm not usually one for having my pudding on the same plate as my main course, but a bit of slow simmered dried fruit in a tagine does go remarkably well. For me, dried apricots are best and in general I really do not like apricots so that's a bit strange really. The only other time I enjoy fruit with meat is in a stuffing and then only with pork or lamb.

    Yep, same same - that vegetable tagine I made last week had some apricots in it, was good. No meat though.

    I also hate fruits in salads, though appreciate I'm not in the majority there. Can't stand apples and pears and sultanas appearing with my greens.

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Catogrande said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones @Hooroo

    I hear you guys and mostly would agree. I'm not usually one for having my pudding on the same plate as my main course, but a bit of slow simmered dried fruit in a tagine does go remarkably well. For me, dried apricots are best and in general I really do not like apricots so that's a bit strange really. The only other time I enjoy fruit with meat is in a stuffing and then only with pork or lamb.

    Yep, same same - that vegetable tagine I made last week had some apricots in it, was good. No meat though.

    I also hate fruits in salads, though appreciate I'm not in the majority there. Can't stand apples and pears and sultanas appearing with my greens.

    Oh come on, not even pear, walnuts, blue cheese and rocket?!



  • @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Catogrande said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones @Hooroo

    I hear you guys and mostly would agree. I'm not usually one for having my pudding on the same plate as my main course, but a bit of slow simmered dried fruit in a tagine does go remarkably well. For me, dried apricots are best and in general I really do not like apricots so that's a bit strange really. The only other time I enjoy fruit with meat is in a stuffing and then only with pork or lamb.

    Yep, same same - that vegetable tagine I made last week had some apricots in it, was good. No meat though.

    I also hate fruits in salads, though appreciate I'm not in the majority there. Can't stand apples and pears and sultanas appearing with my greens.

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Catogrande said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @Bones @Hooroo

    I hear you guys and mostly would agree. I'm not usually one for having my pudding on the same plate as my main course, but a bit of slow simmered dried fruit in a tagine does go remarkably well. For me, dried apricots are best and in general I really do not like apricots so that's a bit strange really. The only other time I enjoy fruit with meat is in a stuffing and then only with pork or lamb.

    Yep, same same - that vegetable tagine I made last week had some apricots in it, was good. No meat though.

    I also hate fruits in salads, though appreciate I'm not in the majority there. Can't stand apples and pears and sultanas appearing with my greens.

    Oh come on, not even pear, walnuts, blue cheese and rocket?!

    Yeah, I can handle that, but I'd probably mostly avoid the pear. The worst is orange. Get out.



  • @canefan Recipe / Method please?



  • @JC said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @canefan Recipe / Method please?

    Corned beef is pre-brined. If you have a large piece cut across the grain into smaller chunks to get more coating on. Soak it for 12hrs in water with water changes every 4 hrs, cut fat off, slather with mustard and rub it with ground pepper corns, celery seed, mustard powder a bit of cumin, garlic powder and smoke at 250-275F. Take off and wrap in double foil with a little water inside, put back in and cook until 195F-205F internal depending on tenderness. Check by poking with skewer or toothpick. Once done remove and vent with foil pack open for 10 minutes then wrap back in foil, tea towel and rest in a chilly bin for a hour or so until slicing



  • @voodoo One of the best salads I've ever had was at a place next to the highway in Hawaii maybe half an hour out of Honolulu, and it had mandarin segments in it. Spicy chicken, avo, salad leaves, red onion, capsicum and mandarin, and I think the dressing also had mandarin juice in it plus more heat. Delicious



  • @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo One of the best salads I've ever had was at a place next to the highway in Hawaii maybe half an hour out of Honolulu, and it had mandarin segments in it. Spicy chicken, avo, salad leaves, red onion, capsicum and mandarin, and I think the dressing also had mandarin juice in it plus more heat. Delicious

    Orange and burnt fennel salad is also nice. And a well made waldorf salad takes me back to childhood



  • @canefan said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    a well made waldorf salad takes me back to childhood

    Yeah, not because I ate them, but because of this:



  • @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo One of the best salads I've ever had was at a place next to the highway in Hawaii maybe half an hour out of Honolulu, and it had mandarin segments in it. Spicy chicken, avo, salad leaves, red onion, capsicum and mandarin, and I think the dressing also had mandarin juice in it plus more heat. Delicious

    Disgusting. Would have been much much better without the orange



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo One of the best salads I've ever had was at a place next to the highway in Hawaii maybe half an hour out of Honolulu, and it had mandarin segments in it. Spicy chicken, avo, salad leaves, red onion, capsicum and mandarin, and I think the dressing also had mandarin juice in it plus more heat. Delicious

    Disgusting. Would have been much much better without the orange

    Switch the orange for bacon



  • @canefan said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @shark said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo One of the best salads I've ever had was at a place next to the highway in Hawaii maybe half an hour out of Honolulu, and it had mandarin segments in it. Spicy chicken, avo, salad leaves, red onion, capsicum and mandarin, and I think the dressing also had mandarin juice in it plus more heat. Delicious

    Disgusting. Would have been much much better without the orange

    Switch the orange for bacon

    Yes!!!

    Pretty sure this also works in any scenario involving an orange



  • @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Pretty sure this also works in any scenario

    Where bacon is concerned, yes, the rest of your sentence wasn't necessary, but I have been down this road on here about bacon before.



  • @Snowy said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    Pretty sure this also works in any scenario

    Where bacon is concerned, yes, the rest of your sentence wasn't necessary, but I have been down this road on here about bacon before.

    Fair point, well made sir



  • So I made this tonight. I didn't take a photo, as I fucked up the bit that gets the full red colour into it. Or maybe the spicy bean paste (we could only find "hot soybean paste") didn't allow it, I'm not sure.

    Anyway, it came out poo brown rather than firey red - the taste was still pretty good, though not as hot as we have had in restaurants

    Overall, I give myself a 5/10. Lots of room for improvement

    https://thewoksoflife.com/sichuan-boiled-beef/



  • @voodoo looks like a shitload of chilli oil in the photo.



  • @canefan said in Recipes, home grown goodness, BBQing and food stuff:

    @voodoo looks like a shitload of chilli oil in the photo.

    Yeah, but zero chilli oil in the recipe!!!


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