Kane Baz & Timmy Win Stuff



  •  
    Kane Williamson's career highest unbeaten 242 in Wellington against Sri Lanka has been voted the top Test batting performance of 2015 at the Maruti Suzuki ESPNcricinfo Awards, announced today. The Test bowling award went to England's Stuart Broad, whose 8 for 15 at Trent Bridge skittled Australia out for 60, paving the way for England to regain the Ashes.
     
    New Zealand players won three awards this year. Tim Southee took the ODI bowling award for his 7 for 33, which bundled England out for 123 in under 34 overs the World Cup; and Brendon McCullum won the Captain of the Year title.
    The best ODI batting performance award went to AB de Villiers, whose 149 off 44 balls against West Indies at the Wanderers contained the fastest ODI hundred (off 31 balls) and fastest fifty (16 balls). He hit 16 sixes (equalling the world record) and nine fours in an innings punctuated with audacious scoops, sweeps and reverse sweeps. He beat a World Cup-heavy shortlist that included another of his own innings - the unbeaten 162, also against West Indies, in Sydney.
    The awards, now in their ninth year, honour the best batting and bowling performances across the international formats of the game in the preceding calendar year. This year's awards were voted on by a jury of former players - among them, Ian Chappell, Mahela Jayawardene, Jeff Dujon, Courtney Walsh, John Wright, Mark Butcher, Mark Nicholas - and ESPNcricinfo's senior writers and editors.
     
    The award for the best T20 batting performance went to India's Rohit Sharma, for his maiden T20I century, against South Africa in Dharamsala. He beat two innings by Chris Gayle to the prize. It was the only performance among this year's award winners that came in a losing cause. The T20 bowling award went to South Africa allrounder David Wiese, who took 5 for 23 against West Indies in Durban.
     
    Mustafizur Rahman won the Debutant of the Year title - a category voted on by ESPNcricinfo's users, in addition to the jury.
     
    Speaking about the awards, Sambit Bal, editor-in-chief of ESPNcricinfo and ESPN South Asia, said, "Cricket is a team game, and wins and losses are the things that matter the most, but the fondest memories come from the great innings or the brilliant spells that shape these outcomes. There could have been only six winners for this year, but the awards are a tribute to all those who were nominated."
     
    Williamson's second-innings knock, with New Zealand up against a first-innings deficit of 135, featured an unbroken record sixth-wicket stand of 365 with BJ Watling that set up a big victory. It was the start of a dream year for Williamson, who scored 1172 Test runs in 16 innings, at an average of 90.15. Incidentally, the 2014 Test batting award also went to a New Zealander, McCullum, who scored 302 at the same venue, against India.
     
    Broad's spell at Trent Bridge sent Australia packing in 18.3 overs in the opening session. It was his career-best performance, and he passed 300 Test wickets in the process. England's innings win gave them an unassailable 3-1 series lead in the Ashes.



  • That spell of Broads was a thing of beauty.



  • So was that spell of Timmy's. Christ has his form dropped off a cliff since then...



  • So was that spell of Timmy's. Christ has his form dropped off a cliff since then...

    Think i saw h has averaged around 70 with the ball in ODI's since that innings. Fuck all with the red ball as well.



  •  
    Kane Williamson's career highest unbeaten 242 in Wellington against Sri Lanka has been voted the top Test batting performance of 2015 at the Maruti Suzuki ESPNcricinfo Awards, announced today. The Test bowling award went to England's Stuart Broad, whose 8 for 15 at Trent Bridge skittled Australia out for 60, paving the way for England to regain the Ashes.
     
    New Zealand players won three awards this year. Tim Southee took the ODI bowling award for his 7 for 33, which bundled England out for 123 in under 34 overs the World Cup; and Brendon McCullum won the Captain of the Year title.
    The best ODI batting performance award went to AB de Villiers, whose 149 off 44 balls against West Indies at the Wanderers contained the fastest ODI hundred (off 31 balls) and fastest fifty (16 balls). He hit 16 sixes (equalling the world record) and nine fours in an innings punctuated with audacious scoops, sweeps and reverse sweeps. He beat a World Cup-heavy shortlist that included another of his own innings - the unbeaten 162, also against West Indies, in Sydney.
    The awards, now in their ninth year, honour the best batting and bowling performances across the international formats of the game in the preceding calendar year. This year's awards were voted on by a jury of former players - among them, Ian Chappell, Mahela Jayawardene, Jeff Dujon, Courtney Walsh, John Wright, Mark Butcher, Mark Nicholas - and ESPNcricinfo's senior writers and editors.
     
    The award for the best T20 batting performance went to India's Rohit Sharma, for his maiden T20I century, against South Africa in Dharamsala. He beat two innings by Chris Gayle to the prize. It was the only performance among this year's award winners that came in a losing cause. The T20 bowling award went to South Africa allrounder David Wiese, who took 5 for 23 against West Indies in Durban.
     
    Mustafizur Rahman won the Debutant of the Year title - a category voted on by ESPNcricinfo's users, in addition to the jury.
     
    Speaking about the awards, Sambit Bal, editor-in-chief of ESPNcricinfo and ESPN South Asia, said, "Cricket is a team game, and wins and losses are the things that matter the most, but the fondest memories come from the great innings or the brilliant spells that shape these outcomes. There could have been only six winners for this year, but the awards are a tribute to all those who were nominated."
     
    Williamson's second-innings knock, with New Zealand up against a first-innings deficit of 135, featured an unbroken record sixth-wicket stand of 365 with BJ Watling that set up a big victory. It was the start of a dream year for Williamson, who scored 1172 Test runs in 16 innings, at an average of 90.15. Incidentally, the 2014 Test batting award also went to a New Zealander, McCullum, who scored 302 at the same venue, against India.
     
    Broad's spell at Trent Bridge sent Australia packing in 18.3 overs in the opening session. It was his career-best performance, and he passed 300 Test wickets in the process. England's innings win gave them an unassailable 3-1 series lead in the Ashes.

    One of these things is not like the other.....



  • Nicholas was apparently quite a good first class player.
    Haven't seen his record to confirm though ... and can't be bothered ...



  • 377 first class matches is a fair haul. Quite warming to him of late, perhaps the nice things he said about hogan
     
    But he does know his cricket



  • His record is pretty average if you ask me but he did play for fucken ages.
     
    His tendancy to suck up to all things Australian irks me a bit.



  • He's got as much right to be there as Mark butcher



  • He's got as much right to be there as Mark butcher

    An average test player is still way better than someone who didn't play a single one.



  • He was a fairly good county batsman and skipper of Hampshire for ages. By all accounts his captaincy was inspired, aggressive, unorthodox (further list of superlatives available on request) but the gist of it is that he was a very intelligent cricketer that got a lot more out of himself than his natural talent would normally allow and also got a lot more out of his team. A conscious incompetent I think is the term. What is does mean though is that his knowledge, commentary etc should not be dismissed just because he wasn't a test player. I can think of many test players, cricketers and rugby players that make shite pundits let alone commentators. 
     
    But yeah he does suck some serious Aussie cock.



  • Good analogy, I guess that as a cricket fan you subconsciously listen to the guy who's been there and done that as a player. Craig Cummings record was extremely modest but he did play for his country at the very least and while Smithy, Doull and Rigor can be a bit love/hate at times all three of them had fine records. Rugby moves too fast for any "back in my day we did things differently" analogies for commentators so it's not an issue.



  • I've never subscribed to that bullshit "you have to have played at the highest level to comment" especially if you're going to include any mug who got a cap.
    There would be bunch of guys from the Aus first class scene from the 90s and early 2000s who've forgotten more about cricket than a bunch of modest test players ever knew.



  • I've never subscribed to that bullshit "you have to have played at the highest level to comment" especially if you're going to include any mug who got a cap.
    There would be bunch of guys from the Aus first class scene from the 90s and early 2000s who've forgotten more about cricket than a bunch of modest test players ever knew.

    Fair call, that's probably true in some cases but Mark Nicholas hardly had a record that demanded his inclusion in the England team and in his era some real donkeys made the cut.



  • Leaving aside his deep throating of anything Ocker, Nicholas has every right to a seat at the commentary table.
     
    Good county career. Captained Hampshire for a long time. Captained England A for a few tours. I'd say that gives him more "credibility" than a one test wonder for (e.g) Zimbabwe....
     
    Plenty of inferior players made it into the England side during his playing career. It seemed like his face didn't fit. Maybe he just didn't suck the right cock. If so, he's certainly taken that lesson on board.
     
    John Arlott, Tony Cozier, Harsha Bogle (never played cricket at any level), Brian Johnstone, Alan McGilvray, Jim Maxwell, Neil Manthorpe, Iain Galloway. Need I go on :idiot2:
     
    An understanding of cricket and an ability to communicate are the two keys, not a stellar playing career



  • Leaving aside his deep throating of anything Ocker, Nicholas has every right to a seat at the commentary table.
     
    Good county career. Captained Hampshire for a long time. Captained England A for a few tours. I'd say that gives him more "credibility" than a one test wonder for (e.g) Zimbabwe....
     
    Plenty of inferior players made it into the England side during his playing career. It seemed like his face didn't fit. Maybe he just didn't suck the right cock. If so, he's certainly taken that lesson on board.
     
    John Arlott, Tony Cozier, Harsha Bogle (never played cricket at any level), Brian Johnstone, Alan McGilvray, Jim Maxwell, Neil Manthorpe, Iain Galloway. Need I go on :idiot2:
     
    An understanding of cricket and an ability to communicate are the two keys, not a stellar playing career

    Yep but if you do that PLUS have a stellar career you're gonna be held in higher regard. R Benaud the best example of that.



  • Yep but if you do that PLUS have a stellar career you're gonna be held in higher regard. R Benaud the best example of that.

    That's not what you said though

    An average test player is still way better than someone who didn't play a single one.

    This statement is just utter crap



  • That's not what you said though
     
     
     
    This statement is just utter crap

    Why ? people always go on about the pinnacle of any sport being representing your country, so many more nerves, it seems to go much faster etcetc. That experience, even once, is in my opinion more priceless than however many provincial/county games.
     
    Anyway, not getting drawn into a stupid argument which no one will win so just gonna leave it there.



  • haha you are talking so much shit.



  • Why ? people always go on about the pinnacle of any sport being representing your country, so many more nerves, it seems to go much faster etcetc. That experience, even once, is in my opinion more priceless than however many provincial/county games.
     
    Anyway, not getting drawn into a stupid argument which no one will win so just gonna leave it there.

    By "noone" do you mean "MN5"?



  • haha you are talking so much shit.

    Pretty mild by my usual standards I would have thought.


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