Law Changes



  • Obviously been around  for a few weeks, so probably a bit late, but I found this explanation from the BOP union quite good.
     
    Media Memo: Law changes a plenty for local rugbyMarch 23, 2016
     
    On January 1 World Rugby (formerly the IRB) implemented a number of law amendments. Below is a summary of the major changes.
     SCRUM: 
     
    When a scrum collapses, if the ball is available to be cleared and the referee deems it safe to play on, then the half back will be urged to clear the ball.  Previously, the referee would simply blow the whistle and reset the scrum.  When the referee makes a mark for a scrum, teams must be ready for the referee to call, “Crouch” within 30 seconds.  This is designed to speed up the game.  When a scrum wheels beyond 90 degrees, the referee orders a new scrum with the same team gets to put the ball in. Previously, the team that fed the ball to the original scrum lost the put in.  This law change is designed to deter teams from wheeling the scrum as there’s no incentive anymore.  If you want to win the ball from a scrum, teams are now encouraged to push straight.  At scrums, the defending halfback is now no longer allowed in the space between the flanker and the number 8.  He must remain out of that space and with both feet behind the ball.  Again this is to ensure annoying halfbacks don’t get in the way of clearing the ball from scrums.  And lastly, when the ball is at the No.8’s feet and the team in possession are trying to push the scrum forward but get no-where, the referee will call, “use it”.  The team in possession must then use the ball immediately.
     MAUL:  
     
    The ball can only be moved backwards in a formed maul by hand.  A player is no longer permitted to move/slide to the back of the maul whilst in possession of the ball.
     
    Any penalty infringement within 5 metres of the goal line or in in goal must now be taken 5 metres from the goal line.  Previously, this only applied to penalties awarded to the attacking team.
     
    Players are not permitted to do anything that may lead the the match officials to consider that they have been subjected to foul play or that their opponent has committed an infringement.  Similar to players diving in Football to gain a penalty, referees now have the power to manage and if necessary penalise players who repeatedly indulge in such behaviour, like throwing their arms in the air in an attempt to influence the referee.
     
    One of the subtle changes you’ve seen while watching Super Rugby ONLY APPLIES TO SUPER RUGBY.  Where time has expired in a half of play and a team is awarded a penalty.  They are now permitted to kick the ball into touch and form a lineout.  Previously, if time was up, they weren’t afforded that luxury.  This is a law variation being trialled in Super Rugby not our local competitons.
     
     CHANGE TO LAW 15/16 (Law Variation Trial)
     
    Bay of Plenty Rugby is implementing one of the law variations that you will see in the upcoming Mitre 10 Cup.  Commencing from round 1 on Thursday 24 March 2016 this law variation will be trialled in our Premier, Premier Development and Division 1 competitons.
     
    In order to make the tackle contact area safer for players, easier for spectators to understand and to ensure that the game moves with the times there’s been some subtle changes to what players can do when they arrive at a tackle and where they’re allowed to come from if they choose to contest for possession. 
    There’s no longer “a gate” at the tackle.  Now players have to enter from behind their tackle mid point.
    There’s been a change in name from a ruck to a breakdown.  This is because there no longer needs to be one player from each team over the ball on the ground.  All it takes to create a breakdown is one attacking support player standing his team mate on the ground.  When that occurs, offside lines appear.
    The major changes to the breakdown that people should see is body height, positioning and arrival.  The overall body height of breakdowns should rise because no one is allowed to have their hands, arms, elbows or heads on the ground, when contesting or securing the ball, nor are they allowed to lean on any ball carrier or tackler already on the ground.
    The other major change occurs to the very first defender that arrives at a tackle but before a breakdown is formed.  Previously, this player was permitted to attack the ball and continue to stay in the contest, even after a ruck has formed over the top of him.  Now, if he hasn’t won clear possession (in other words clearly picked the ball up off the ground) then he is liable to be penalised.
     
    This subtle change to law 15/16 should bring about a faster game with less injuries.  Coaches have been encouraged to teach their players to make smarter decisions when they make or arrive at a tackle and referees are being asked to be hard on those that make the wrong choice.



  • Cheers for that!
     
    There was a scrum in the Chiefs game and I couldn't believe the Ref let it stay collapsed but that new rule explains it.
     
    It is a great rule as sometime the Refs are just plain guessing why it has gone down. This helps eliminate those decisions and lets the game move on.
     
    It doesn't mention the new lineouot rule after time up but I also like that rule too



  • Hope someone sent this memo to Andrew Lees as he obviously didn't see it first time around.
     
    In the Blues/Reds clusterfuck of a game he ignored the one about the halfback not going past the flanker and never called 'use it' when the Reds where holding the ball at the base of the scrum and having a second push to milk a penalty.
     
    These changes have been quite good although the comment about there being no incentive any more to wheel a scrum is patently incorrect. It has always been an aim at times to skew to (or away from) the blindside to reduce options for the attacking team.



  • Cheers for that!
     
    There was a scrum in the Chiefs game and I couldn't believe the Ref let it stay collapsed but that new rule explains it.
     
    It is a great rule as sometime the Refs are just plain guessing why it has gone down. This helps eliminate those decisions and lets the game move on.
     
    It doesn't mention the new lineouot rule after time up but I also like that rule too

    I've got some bad news for you...
    One of the subtle changes you’ve seen while watching Super Rugby ONLY APPLIES TO SUPER RUGBY.  Where time has expired in a half of play and a team is awarded a penalty.  They are now permitted to kick the ball into touch and form a lineout.  Previously, if time was up, they weren’t afforded that luxury.  This is a law variation being trialled in Super Rugby not our local competitons.
     
    Pretty much all of those rules seem straight forward and make sense. I do roll my eyes at the maul change though, took them long enough to bloody spot that one, huh? Seeing as they weren't meant to be able to slide back through the maul in the first place, it seems to me like it's an interpretation refs will crack down on for a while but then we'll start seeing it pop back up again.



  • Yeah the maul change is well overdue, now they just have to enforce it



  • Thanks for that Baron - anyone got Nisbett and Marshalls email address to forward that?



  • I don't even have much of a problem with the ball carrier moving backwards so much as the blatant joining from the side.
     
    There were a heap of Pocock's tries last year for the Brumbies where his teammates joined in front of him.
     
    Just enforce the laws!



  • I don't even have much of a problem with the ball carrier moving backwards so much as the blatant joining from the side.
     
    There were a heap of Pocock's tries last year for the Brumbies where his teammates joined in front of him.
     
    Just enforce the laws!

    Often though, they would join by touching him as they went past which is deemed legal for some reason.



  • Often though, they would join by touching him as they went past which is deemed legal for some reason.

    Yes what's often referred to as swimming.
     
    But there were even examples where guys didn't even bother doing that.
     
    Go watch the tries from the game where he got a hat trick.


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