Sevens to stay in Wellytown



  • http://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/rugby/78209893/wellington-races-through-to-score-the-sevens-against-scant-opposition
     
    The sevens tournament looks set to stay in Wellington.
    No contracts have been signed but, following detailed board room discussion, New Zealand Rugby is expected to confirm on Thursday the event will remain in the capital for the forseeable future.
    Despite this year's event losing $300,000, Wellington stakeholders were very keen to keep the hosting rights.

    MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ MONIQUE FORD/FAIRFAX NZ HAGEN HOPKINS/GETTY IMAGES HAGEN HOPKINS/GETTY IMAGES HAGEN HOPKINS/GETTY IMAGES

    Boyd Smith of Dunedin during NZ v Russia at the 2016 Wellington Sevens.

    The crowd enjoy the atmosphere of the 2016 Wellington Sevens.

    Rebecca Wright, Felicity Heath, Roshni Mortensen wouldn't have missed the 2016 sevens.

    Semi pro film theme workmates from Melbourne at the Wellington Sevens.

    Plenty of unusual costumes on display.

    Family outing ... Shiree Davis, Brent Davis and Tony Davis at the 2016 Wellington Sevens.

    New Zealand off to a winning start at the 2016 Wellington Sevens.

    All the way from Oamaru supporting No. 5 for Scotland, Nick McLennan.

    Dave Gibbon of Auckand was at the 2016 Wellington Sevens to support South Africa.

    Tegan Butler, 12, Merys Butler and Tomos Butler, 13, of Napier, at the 2016 Wellington Sevens to supoprt their native Scotland.

    Burglars: John Kelleher and Charmaine Jones of Whitby .

    Cory Jane and Julian Savea pose in their zombie costumes.

    Kenya players form a team huddle at the 2016 Wellington Sevens.

    Westpac Stadium gets ready for the 2016 Wellington Sevens.

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    In the end, Wellington had little competition.
    READ MORE:
    * Editorial: SOS Save the Wellington Sevens

    • Who killed the Wellington Sevens?
      * OPINION: Wowsers have ruined the Wellington Sevens
      * Wellington Sevens fights for its future
      * Wellington Sevens under the microscope as organisers review success
      * Is Dunedin eyeing up Wellington's Sevens?
       
       
      Dunedin students aren't in town when the sevens world tour comes to New Zealand and timing of the event can't be drastically moved.
      It is believed Christchurch doesn't have infrastructure to support the event at present.
      Auckland's hosting of rugby league's Nines creates competitive tensions.  
      RHIANNON McCONNELL/FAIRFAX NZ

    It's thumbs up for the Wellington Sevens. Henry Pretorius, Ludovic Dubois, Richard Wade and Brent Thompson at the tournament.

    And Hamilton hasn't shown a great deal of interest.

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    Most host cities on the World Sevens circuit are granted a four-year licence but it is understood NZR are not prepared to commit to that length of agreement in Wellington. 
    While new events such as Sydney and Vancouver draw big gates, the popularity of the Wellington Sevens has been on a downward spiral. 
    This year's event averaged crowds of 15,000 people on both days in the 34,000 capacity stadium. In its heyday, the event sold out in a matter of minutes.   
    A combination of factors, including waning interest and a crackdown on intoxication which featured breathing testing complaints, turned punters off the event in recent times.
    New Zealand Rugby Players' Association chief executive Rob Nichol is confident the event can be a success.
    "We all know for various reasons and pressures there's been a move towards a more responsible pitch of the tournament where there is the opportunity to go and have your party but there has to be certain levels of responsibility met," Nichol said.
    "There's also been greater emphasis on trying to create zones for families. The feeling and feedback I got was they got the balance right this year.
    "We felt the quality of rugby was outstanding - probably the best it's been. When you put all that together they've got a plan and they're on a pathway. Now may well be the time to stick with that plan and let it build some momentum."
     - Stuff



  • As much as i would love to see hordes of kids go along to this event i think the only way to actually get the numbers back is to make it a adult focused event. Potentially R18.
    That would never happen though.
    Sent from my SM-G925I using Tapatalk



  • As much as i would love to see hordes of kids go along to this event i think the only way to actually get the numbers back is to make it a adult focused event. Potentially R18.
    That would never happen though.
    Sent from my SM-G925I using Tapatalk

    I have said it before getting hordes of 5 year olds to sit in a stadium for 18 hours is always going to be difficult.
     
    I don't care much whether the event continues in Wellington. I just hope that ratepayers aren't made to fund it anymore. We should only provide funding for events which bring significant people to the city.



  • I have said it before getting hordes of 5 year olds to sit in a stadium for 18 hours is always going to be difficult.
     
    I don't care much whether the event continues in Wellington. I just hope that ratepayers aren't made to fund it anymore. We should only provide funding for events which bring significant people to the city.

    Why would they have to sit in a stadium for 18 hours? You can buy half-day tickets!
     
    I think Wellington 7s greatest problem is the inadequate advertising of the event; promotion was minimal!
    Add to that the always negative, mostly Auckland based media/journos, who keep on repeating themselves, and then a lot of people get the idea that it's still a drunken mess, or alternatively, that it's no longer fun because of fun police. Neither were true!



  • What no Queenstown?



  • Bad decision IMO. Having all the media focus on how few tickets are sold while the Auckland nines is talked up in the media at the start of every year is not good for rugbys image. Next year will be worse with no Olympic interest.
     
    Wellingtonians are just bored with it move it around a bit then bring it back in 3 years.



  • Bad decision IMO. Having all the media focus on how few tickets are sold while the Auckland nines is talked up in the media at the start of every year is not good for rugbys image. Next year will be worse with no Olympic interest.
     
    Wellingtonians are just bored with it move it around a bit then bring it back in 3 years.

    I think you're hitting the nail on the head: the media should stop being so negative in its reporting because I'm convinced they are a major factor in how the tournament is being perceived and in whether people will turn up. Most of the crap the media has been spewing about the Wellington sevens the last few years was written by journos who are not even based in Wellington and haven't probably been attending the tournament for years. But that's NZ media for you, rather write something negative than positive.



  • "the feeling and feedback I got was they got the balance right this year."
     
    From the 15 people that went.
     
    Perhaps you should have got some feedback from the 20,000 that didn't go.



  • What no Queenstown?

    Queenstown would be bloody great.



  • Why would they have to sit in a stadium for 18 hours? You can buy half-day tickets!
     
    I think Wellington 7s greatest problem is the inadequate advertising of the event; promotion was minimal!
    Add to that the always negative, mostly Auckland based media/journos, who keep on repeating themselves, and then a lot of people get the idea that it's still a drunken mess, or alternatively, that it's no longer fun because of fun police. Neither were true!

    Uh yes they were that's why no one went, it used to sell out in minutes online. Not anymore.
     
    In the mid 2000s the Sevens was fucken excellent fun, I was lucky enough to go for free in the corp box, great having the freedom to mix with the commoners and then go up and have the finest seafood and ice cold Heineken.



  • Why would they have to sit in a stadium for 18 hours? You can buy half-day tickets!
     
    I think Wellington 7s greatest problem is the inadequate advertising of the event; promotion was minimal!
    Add to that the always negative, mostly Auckland based media/journos, who keep on repeating themselves, and then a lot of people get the idea that it's still a drunken mess, or alternatively, that it's no longer fun because of fun police. Neither were true!

    I don't really know what else you can say about an event which can't half fill a stadium when places like Vancouver sell out. The media's job isn't to always be positive. I watch 7's, I like watching 7's unfortunately most other New Zealanders don't seem to like the game very much.
     
    As for promotion, there was a whole 7 days of festivities leading up to the event. I have been to hundreds of events in Wellington which got more people with less promotion.



  • Bad decision IMO. Having all the media focus on how few tickets are sold while the Auckland nines is talked up in the media at the start of every year is not good for rugbys image. Next year will be worse with no Olympic interest.
     
    Wellingtonians are just bored with it move it around a bit then bring it back in 3 years.

    The problem is that no one else wants it. If the event leaves Wellington, it leaves New Zealand.



  • The problem is that no one else wants it. If the event leaves Wellington, it leaves New Zealand.

    Then frankly, so be it.  Why should World Rugby be bothered with it when places like Vancouver are selling out.
     
    It seems if NZ fans aren't going, there are plenty of other places that have the fans to go.  Move it, I say.



  • did vancouver really sell out? looked like the whole top tier of the stadium was "blacked out"? or was i not paying attention?



  • did vancouver really sell out? looked like the whole top tier of the stadium was "blacked out"? or was i not paying attention?

    As I understand it the stadium at Vancouver has a situation where the top tier can be opened fully, opened partially, or not opened at all, depending on the event (they can bring the internal 'roof' down to partition off the top tier if it is not being used).
     
    From what I understand, the top tier was semi-opened for the 7s (as well as the whole lower bowl). So while the whole stadium was not full, the event did sell out in relation to how many seats were available. I think total capacity is about 55,000 and I think the crowd was around 33,000 each day.
     
    I'm guessing with the demand the whole stadium may be opened up for next year's event.



  • Then frankly, so be it.  Why should World Rugby be bothered with it when places like Vancouver are selling out.
     
    It seems if NZ fans aren't going, there are plenty of other places that have the fans to go.  Move it, I say.

    That would be bad for sevens in New Zealand but maybe what World Rugby will have to do if crowds don't pick up. I think the best chance is moving the 7's to Eden Park when the Nines leave.



  • I don't really know what else you can say about an event which can't half fill a stadium when places like Vancouver sell out. The media's job isn't to always be positive. I watch 7's, I like watching 7's unfortunately most other New Zealanders don't seem to like the game very much.
     
    As for promotion, there was a whole 7 days of festivities leading up to the event. I have been to hundreds of events in Wellington which got more people with less promotion.

    Have you seen the promotion of the Auckland 9s on Sky? Every night, multiple times. No ads for the Wellington 7s whatsoever on tv, at least I didn't see them. You don't advertise for such an event only in Wellington and only in the week leading up to the event.
    It was promoted really badly, in comparison with a similar event, which is the Auckland 9s!
     
    I agree the media's job isn't to always be positive. The problem is that they only highlighted and repeated and repeated and repeated the perceived negative aspects of the current format, ignored the negative aspects of the boozing culture of past events. If you read that on a regular basis, some people are actually going to believe that, even if they didn't before. There were lots of positives to, but they were maybe mentioned once in a while, somewhere hidden inbetween all the moaning.
     
    Vancouver sold out, and Sydney almost sold out, because it was their first time. You can't compare. Let's wait and see if they still sell out after they have organised for five years or more.



  • Uh yes they were that's why no one went, it used to sell out in minutes online. Not anymore.
     
    In the mid 2000s the Sevens was fucken excellent fun, I was lucky enough to go for free in the corp box, great having the freedom to mix with the commoners and then go up and have the finest seafood and ice cold Heineken.

    No, they were not. It was a perception only, fed by the media and people who can't have fun without being drunk (I'm not talking about people who want to have a few drinks only).
     
    Was it still a drunken mess?

    • No, it was not. I've only seen two people causing trouble, who were removed by police on Sunday.
       
      It's no longer fun because of the fun police?
    • How can people know if they weren't there? All the people that I know, who were there, including my mates and I, we all had a great time on both days. As soon as we moved from the cold areas (in the shadow) to the aisles in the sun, we noticed that the atmosphere in those fuller aisles was great! More people discovered that, resulting in some aisles becoming emptier and emptier, and the "sunny aisles" becoming almost completely full. All thanks to being allowed to move around and change seats. What do you read in the media? You weren't allowed to move around. Complete rubbish. 
       
      I'm not without criticism about the organisation, but what the media write and some people - who weren't there - claim about the event, is excessively negative. And they reinforce each other, unfortunately.


  • No, they were not. It was a perception only, fed by the media and people who can't have fun without being drunk (I'm not talking about people who want to have a few drinks only).
     
    Was it still a drunken mess?

    • No, it was not. I've only seen two people causing trouble, who were removed by police on Sunday.
       
      It's no longer fun because of the fun police?
    • How can people know if they weren't there? All the people that I know, who were there, including my mates and I, we all had a great time on both days. As soon as we moved from the cold areas (in the shadow) to the aisles in the sun, we noticed that the atmosphere in those fuller aisles was great! More people discovered that, resulting in some aisles becoming emptier and emptier, and the "sunny aisles" becoming almost completely full. All thanks to being allowed to move around and change seats. What do you read in the media? You weren't allowed to move around. Complete rubbish. 
       
      I'm not without criticism about the organisation, but what the media write and some people - who weren't there - claim about the event, is excessively negative. And they reinforce each other, unfortunately.

    They know because there were fun police in other years who ruined the event. Thus people decided not to turn up. I think it's great that 15,000 people had a great time. Why do you think people turned up five years ago but not now, if it wasn't for the restrictions?



  • They know because there were fun police in other years who ruined the event. Thus people decided not to turn up. I think it's great that 15,000 people had a great time. Why do you think people turned up five years ago but not now, if it wasn't for the restrictions?

    Because the media keep on writing about how people don't like it because of the restrictions, sometimes telling half-truths. Some people, who read that, start believing it if the media keep on repeating it often enough.
    Other people, who didn't like the boozing culture and stayed away in previous years, may not have read those media and may not be aware that things have changed.
     
    I also think people stayed away because prices are still too high (although lower and with more options than previous years; not everyone knows this, I noticed). I have said before, there is definitely much room for improvement, starting with the food/drink options and prices, and the entertainment around the event, and inbetween games, but people are IMO really too negative!


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