Coronavirus - Overall



  • @Victor-Meldrew said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Catogrande said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @pakman said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Catogrande said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Bones @Victor-Meldrew @MiketheSnow

    I took it as don’t clap for me today and then tell to to fuck off back to my own country when this is all over. Maybe simplistic but sometimes a good cigar is just a good cigar.

    Surely any immigrants who wanted to stay would have registered for settled status. If not, they can't complain?

    I don't think it has anything much to do with settled status etc or being eligible to stay. It is to do with many of these people, some immigrants, some British from a different background experiencing racism and now having people standing outside their front doors clapping for them every Friday.

    Perhaps we need a register of right-on, non-racist people who are allowed to clap for the NHS....

    Now you know that wasn’t the gist of my point 🙄

    But having said that I do think we need someone to be the arbiter if what is socially acceptable. Would it be considered infra-dig for me to nominate me?



  • @Bones said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Catogrande said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @pakman said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Catogrande said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Bones @Victor-Meldrew @MiketheSnow

    I took it as don’t clap for me today and then tell to to fuck off back to my own country when this is all over. Maybe simplistic but sometimes a good cigar is just a good cigar.

    Surely any immigrants who wanted to stay would have registered for settled status. If not, they can't complain?

    I don't think it has anything much to do with settled status etc or being eligible to stay. It is to do with many of these people, some immigrants, some British from a different background experiencing racism and now having people standing outside their front doors clapping for them every Friday.

    Only a truly evil, ignorant bastard would do it a day late...

    See. No one really cares.



  • @Catogrande said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    But having said that I do think we need someone to be the arbiter if what is socially acceptable.

    I thought that was Kim Khardashian



  • @Victor-Meldrew said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Catogrande said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    But having said that I do think we need someone to be the arbiter if what is socially acceptable.

    I thought that was Kim Khardashian

    Nope, it's Jameela



  • @Billy-Tell that's pretty interesting that they're predicting the same financial repercussions that the lockdown countries are expecting (this year).

    Would be interesting to see if they predict they will be better off financially in the medium - long term by creating a herd immunity. Maybe they also have no faith in a vaccine ever being created.

    You'd be gutted to have lost all those lives only to have the same financial disaster the lockdown countries are heading for.



  • @Toddy said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Billy-Tell that's pretty interesting that they're predicting the same financial repercussions that the lockdown countries are expecting (this year).

    Would be interesting to see if they predict they will be better off financially in the medium - long term by creating a herd immunity. Maybe they also have no faith in a vaccine ever being created.

    You'd be gutted to have lost all those lives only to have the same financial disaster the lockdown countries are heading for.

    I’m not sure about this herd immunity thing. That assumes it’s the same strain of the virus year in year out. The flu is not like that. More of a concept for bacterial infections. I think there’s pretty overwhelming evidence now that going with the no lockdown idea is a bad one. Here in Switzerland the government is expected to start easing back shortly. So it’ll have been about 6 weeks of pain but the Swiss curve, like NZ, is clearly on the way down. A free for all with no lockdown would have been much much worse.



  • @Billy-Tell said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Toddy said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Billy-Tell that's pretty interesting that they're predicting the same financial repercussions that the lockdown countries are expecting (this year).

    Would be interesting to see if they predict they will be better off financially in the medium - long term by creating a herd immunity. Maybe they also have no faith in a vaccine ever being created.

    You'd be gutted to have lost all those lives only to have the same financial disaster the lockdown countries are heading for.

    I’m not sure about this herd immunity thing. That assumes it’s the same strain of the virus year in year out. The flu is not like that. More of a concept for bacterial infections. I think there’s pretty overwhelming evidence now that going with the no lockdown idea is a bad one. Here in Switzerland the government is expected to start easing back shortly. So it’ll have been about 6 weeks of pain but the Swiss curve, like NZ, is clearly on the way down. A free for all with no lockdown would have been much much worse.

    Not sure the correct epidemiological terminology, but I think they're looking for 'seasonal' herd immunity, which would get them through NH winter. And that at some stage that a vaccine can be found.



  • @Godder said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Godder said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Paekakboyz said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @MajorRage have we seen the nz govt say it's an eradication goal? I haven't caught that anywhere as yet.

    I think the NZ goal is elimination, not eradication, as people will still travel here with it from time to time (and be quarantined on arrival).

    How many people do you think will extend their planned business trip or holiday by two weeks?

    Probably not many, hence all the predictions about the demise of international tourism as a significant part of the NZ economy.

    The question was rhetorical.



  • @Toddy said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    Would be interesting to see if they predict they will be better off financially in the medium - long term by creating a herd immunity. Maybe they also have no faith in a vaccine ever being created.

    Reminds me of this article with Jane Halton:

    The Australian woman driving the global search for a COVID-19 ­vaccine has warned that there is no guarantee of success and the government must have a “plan B” to end the pandemic.

    The sobering assessment by Jane Halton, a former federal mandarin who chairs the Bill Gates-backed Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, will dampen hope that a vaccine could be available early next year.

    Puncturing the optimism fired by first-stage human trials of a vaccine in the US and accelerated progress towards others here, in China and Israel, Ms Halton said it was “heroic” to assume an answer to the virus would emerge so soon.

    Some scientists involved in the CEPI-sponsored program insist that a 12- to 18-month timeline is realistic, but Ms Halton told The Weekend Australian: “If you said we pulled out all the stops and a vaccine was approved and deemed efficacious by the middle of next year, that would be unbelievably quick … we would be ecstatically overjoyed, delighted.

    “But I do think it is important not to create unrealistic expect­ations. No one has ever successfully developed a coronavirus vaccine, and we still don’t have a vaccine against HIV.

    “I would never say never. But this is my point about an 18-month timeline: it is heroic, really tough.”



  • Forums: essential services.







  • Reports flying around U.S. media today that virus came from Wuhan lab, Chinese authorities knew it, deflected by blaming wet market. Ordinarily I might relegate it to conspiracy talk, which it is, but this ain’t Infowars, it’s coming from Fox News, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post...



  • @Salacious-Crumb said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    Reports flying around U.S. media today that virus came from Wuhan lab, Chinese authorities knew it, deflected by blaming wet market. Ordinarily I might relegate it to conspiracy talk, which it is, but this ain’t Infowars, it’s coming from Fox News, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post...

    @Tim posted a twitter thread earlier debunking that conspiratorial nonsense. I wouldn't be getting my science from Fox et al.



  • @antipodean funny how you single out fox.



  • @Salacious-Crumb said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean funny how you single out fox.

    Why is it funny?



  • @antipodean said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Salacious-Crumb said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean funny how you single out fox.

    Why is it funny?

    Where do you get your science from, then? Twitter?

    The guy you quoted sums up thusly:

    “...it appears that the genetic differences in #nCoV2019 are consistent with differences expected to arise during natural evolution,...”

    “Appears” means conclusive?



  • @Salacious-Crumb said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Salacious-Crumb said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean funny how you single out fox.

    Why is it funny?

    Where do you get your science from, then? Twitter?

    Can't explain why you find it funny?

    The guy you quoted sums up thusly:

    “...it appears that the genetic differences in #nCoV2019 are consistent with differences expected to arise during natural evolution,...”

    “Appears” means conclusive?

    You know why experts tend to couch their statements? Because they acknowledge the possibility of new evidence. I'll take people who know what they're talking about over talking foreheads and journalists.



  • @antipodean What, I gotta explain comedy now? This might have been the first time, certainly in the past twenty years, that I think I’ve seen-or-heard the Washington Post referred as an “et al” appended in relation to Fox News. Contextually funny. It’s not a huge laugh, but it makes me giggle.



  • @antipodean said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    You know why experts tend to couch their statements?

    Yeah, like politicians. Many of these “experts” have helped get us to where we are right now.

    Because they acknowledge the possibility of new evidence.

    Exactly. Facts on the ground change. And new reports are coming out this hour that the Chinese destroyed evidence.

    I’m reading reports. Is it fabricated nonsense? Could be. Don’t shoot the messenger.

    I'll take people who know what they're talking about over talking foreheads and journalists.

    Okay, so no evidence was destroyed. End of. Next.



  • @Salacious-Crumb said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean What, I gotta explain comedy now? This might have been the first time, certainly in the past twenty years, that I think I’ve seen-or-heard the Washington Post referred as an “et al” appended in relation to Fox News. Contextually funny. It’s not a huge laugh, but it makes me giggle.

    That would be a very generous inference from what you originally implied. For your own future benefit, me typing et al is simply because I couldn't be fucked typing them all out. Had you put WaPo first in your list, it would've been WaPo et al in my response.



  • @antipodean It was right there from the first draft. No stealth edits — hell, it’s even in your quote, and I cannot alter that. Washington Post. Wall Street Journal, too. Have a go at them while you’re at it.



  • @Salacious-Crumb said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean It was rigt there from the first minute. No stealth edits. Washington Post. Wall Street Journal, too. Have a go at them while you’re at it.

    Look up et al ffs. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/et-al



  • @antipodean

    Look, this is a silly argument. I just ask questions. And I’m glad to know there’s somebody with the answers and can provide me some comic relief. Thank you.



  • @Salacious-Crumb said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean

    Look, this is a silly argument. I just ask questions. And I’m glad to know there’s somebody with the answers and can provide me some comic relief. Thank you.

    Great, so now you can nominate me in these two threads:

    1. https://www.forum.thesilverfern.com/topic/3898/nomination-ferner-most-like-to-have-a-beer-with/66
    2. https://www.forum.thesilverfern.com/topic/3905/nomination-favourite-overseas-ferner/28


  • @Tim

    I don't think the disease was manufactured, but reports I read seemed to indicate it came from a lab that was studying infectious diseases (as opposed to creating them). Is that plausible?

    I'm interested to hear your thoughts on where this may have originated - obviously it's all guess work and we probably won't ever get a definitive answer.



  • @No-Quarter said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Tim

    I don't think the disease was manufactured, but reports I read seemed to indicate it came from a lab that was studying infectious diseases (as opposed to creating them). Is that plausible?

    I'm interested to hear your thoughts on where this may have originated - obviously it's all guess work and we probably won't ever get a definitive answer.

    What I read was that the virus was characteristic of a coronavirus that had mutated as opposed to something totally new



  • @antipodean said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @Salacious-Crumb said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean

    Look, this is a silly argument. I just ask questions. And I’m glad to know there’s somebody with the answers and can provide me some comic relief. Thank you.

    Great, so now you can nominate me in these two threads:

    1. https://www.forum.thesilverfern.com/topic/3898/nomination-ferner-most-like-to-have-a-beer-with/66
    2. https://www.forum.thesilverfern.com/topic/3905/nomination-favourite-overseas-ferner/28

    The playground is lively today.



  • @antipodean said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    Clap for Connie.



  • @Bones said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    @antipodean said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    Clap for Connie.

    They probably should have fixed that before letting her out



  • @Siam Took me a moment but lol!



  • @Siam if she can get it (boom tish) at 106 more power to her! but maybe someone needs to remind Great Nan to wrap before she taps it!







  • UK in lockdown for at least 3 more weeks. Raab puts in place five tests that have to be met until there will be any relaxation of the lockdown. Indicates most restrictions like to remain until June. Some will remain until a vaccine is in place. Nearly 14,000 dead. All a bit shit to be honest.



  • Despite some fairly clear instructions it seems that even intelligent people do not quite get it. Was talking to someone today who is part of the skeleton staff at a professional business. One of the skeleton staff is now self isolating as he is showing symptoms of the CV. I asked what she was doing about self isolating as she had been working in the same office as the potentially infected guy. "Oh no need I haven't seen him for a week now."

    No concept about what she might have been spreading during that week.



  • @Billy-Tell said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    What I take from this, is that NZ should definitely have favoured the economy at the expense of lockdown...

    Sweden has passed the grim milestone of 1,000 coronavirus deaths, far exceeding the tolls of its nearest neighbours, but suggested it may be nearing the outbreak’s peak as scientists continue to question the government’s light-touch approach.

    The Public Health Agency announced a death toll of 1,203 people from Covid-19 on Wednesday, a rate of 101 per million inhabitants, compared to 51 in Denmark and just 11 in Finland, both of which imposed strict early lockdowns to curb the virus’s spread.

    Sweden’s per-million tally is also significantly higher than the 37 recorded in Germany and the comparable US figure of 79 – but remains lower than the UK’s rate of 182 and far below Italy’s 348 and Spain’s 386.

    Anders Wallensten, the deputy chief epidemiologist, said the number of new Covid-19 cases was starting to decline and he was “cautiously positive” Sweden was approaching the peak. Officials said the health system was coping.

    Polling suggests many Swedes continue to support the government’s strategy, which has entailed urging citizens to take personal responsibility for following physical distancing guidelines rather than strictly enforcing mandatory rules.

    While authorities have closed senior high schools and banned gatherings of more than 50 people, they have asked – rather than ordered – people to avoid non-essential travel, work from home and stay indoors if they are over 70 or are feeling ill.

    Statistics show roughly half the Swedish workforce is now working from home, public transport usage has fallen by 50% in Stockholm and the capital’s streets are about 70% less busy than usual – but Swedes are still able to shop, go to restaurants, get haircuts and send children under 16 to class even if a family member is ill.

    The government’s refusal to close primary and junior high schools – and authorities’ insistence that only children who are themselves ill may stay at home – has caused some families and teachers particular concern, staff and parent groups have said.

    Healthy students who have been kept out of school by anxious parents have been threatened with referral to social services, while concerned families and school staff have written open letters describing the government’s policy as “unacceptable” and arguing that it is “risking the lives of children, relatives and staff”.

    In one letter published last week in Aftonbladet newspaper, more than 900 teachers and school staff said it was impossible for schools and daycare facilities to observe physical distancing recommendations, adding that “in many cases” children with infected family members had obeyed instructions to attend school, meaning “we are not able to protect children and educators in at-risk groups”.

    Anders Tegnell, the country’s chief epidemiologist, has described the Swedish approach as an attempt to ensure “a slow spread of infection and that the health services are not overwhelmed”, arguing that it is important for a part of the population to acquire immunity.

    Tegnell has denied trying to build rapid “herd immunity” to the virus, a strategy originally adopted by the UK and the Netherlands before projected soaring death numbers prompted those countries to change course.

    Some experts have speculated that Sweden’s approach to managing the spread of the virus may also be influenced by its demographic profile – more than 50% of households are single-person – and relatively low population density of about 25 people per square kilometre, compared, for example, to 205 in Italy.

    Although the longer-term impact is obviously unknown, Sweden’s strategy is not expected to preserve the country’s economy this year any more than those of countries imposing stricter lockdowns: Magdalena Andersson, the finance minister, said on Wednesday GDP could shrink by 10% this year and unemployment rise to 13.5%.

    The strategy has also come under fire from some of the country’s scientists. A group of 22 doctors, virologists and researchers on Tuesday criticised the health agency in an op-ed published by Dagens Nyheter newspaper.

    “The approach must be changed radically and quickly,” the group wrote. “As the virus spreads, it is necessary to increase social distance. Close schools and restaurants. Everyone who works with the elderly must wear adequate protective equipment. Quarantine the whole family if one member is ill or tests positive. Elected representatives must intervene, there is no other choice.”

    Tegnell rejected the criticism and disputed the figures on which it was based. He previously said Sweden and its neighbours were on “different places on the curve”, and that Sweden had “unfortunately had a large spread of contagion in care homes for the elderly, something you have not seen in the other Nordic countries”.

    The chief epidemiologist has repeatedly stressed that the world is in uncharted territory with the coronavirus, arguing that while Sweden might have more infections in the short term, it will not face the risk of a huge infection increase that many other countries might face once their strict lockdowns are lifted.



  • @Catogrande said in Coronavirus - Overall:

    Despite some fairly clear instructions it seems that even intelligent people do not quite get it. Was talking to someone today who is part of the skeleton staff at a professional business. One of the skeleton staff is now self isolating as he is showing symptoms of the CV. I asked what she was doing about self isolating as she had been working in the same office as the potentially infected guy. "Oh no need I haven't seen him for a week now."

    No concept about what she might have been spreading during that week.

    It's all about population density.






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