The thread of learning something new every day



  • For trivia, "astounding facts", and what have you.



  • [b][url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hematogen]Hematogen[/url][/b] (Russian: Гематоген, Gematogen; Latin: Haematogenum) is a[b] Russian nutrition bar[/b], which is notable in that one of its main ingredients is [b]black food albumin taken from processed (defibrinated) cow's blood[/b]. Other ingredients may vary, but usually they're sugar, milk, vanillin.
    It is often considered to be a medicinal product, and is used to treat or prevent low blood levels of iron and vitamin B12 (e.g., for anemia or during pregnancy). Gematogen daily dose (50 grams for an adult) is able to provide the body with the necessary quantity of vitamin A.
    It is available without prescription but in a case of pregnancy or breastfeeding a medical consultation is needed. Hematogen is not recommended for kids under 3 years old.
    [url=http://imgur.com/i8RbuZ6][/url]



  • Cool idea for a thread mate



  • https://www.bighistoryproject.com/home
     
    I've been watching this in my lunch break each day as a "learn shit every day" routine. Its fricking awesome, a bit like Bill Brysons history of everything, which I read religiously on the shitter for 2 years (just when shitting, I didn't spend 2 years straight in there).
     
    Basically it explains the uniiverse from the start. Its great ammo for being in a discussion with someone who thinks the world is 6,000 years old. technically its aimed at high scholl / uni level, but it works on most levels.  
     
    Its also done by, apparently, Bill Gate's favourite scientist.



  • Basically it explains the uniiverse from the start. Its great ammo for being in a discussion with someone who thinks the world is 6,000 years old.

    If the discussion doesn't end after you say "dinosaur bones" aren't you wasting your time?



  • If the discussion doesn't end after you say "dinosaur bones" aren't you wasting your time?

    Satan put those there to test us, thats a "Theory" like evolution & gravity, God made the earth with those already in it like a treasure hunt, or they died out in the great flood. 
     
    Its more for the whole "how could we come from a star?". Actually gives you the science to explain that.



  • https://www.bighistoryproject.com/home
     
    I've been watching this in my lunch break each day as a "learn shit every day" routine. Its fricking awesome, a bit like Bill Brysons history of everything, which I read religiously on the shitter for 2 years (just when shitting, I didn't spend 2 years straight in there).
     
    Basically it explains the uniiverse from the start. Its great ammo for being in a discussion with someone who thinks the world is 6,000 years old. technically its aimed at high scholl / uni level, but it works on most levels.  
     
    Its also done by, apparently, Bill Gate's favourite scientist.

    If you're dealing with people who think the planet is 6,000 years old, you're in the right territory



  • https://www.bighistoryproject.com/home
    I've been watching this in my lunch break each day as a "learn shit every day" routine. Its fricking awesome, a bit like Bill Brysons history of everything, which I read religiously on the shitter for 2 years (just when shitting, I didn't spend 2 years straight in there).
    Basically it explains the uniiverse from the start. Its great ammo for being in a discussion with someone who thinks the world is 6,000 years old. technically its aimed at high scholl / uni level, but it works on most levels.
    Its also done by, apparently, Bill Gate's favourite scientist.I am a fan of all things Bill Bryson and History of Everything in particular.......Only one of his books I didnt enjoy was his travel diary through Africa......clearly he did'nt want to be there.....
    On a completely different note......I have recently added the words 'clusterfuck' and 'fluffybunny' to my vocabulary......as used only on the Fern!
    Fluffybunny was really hard.......but I thought if its good enough for Sid......then who am I to resist......
    The Big History link is brilliant....... Ties in perfectly with my cynical/ contrarian outlook on basically everything. I am trying to teach my son at the moment the simple principle of.....the more you know.....the more you know that you don't know! I am still trying to get all the bullshit out of my mind that we have been fed as gospel since childhood ( yeah....pun intended) I am hoping I can give my son a head start......



  • Amazing craftsmanship:
     


     
    And this too
     



  • Today I learned about Heather McKay. I'd never heard of her until someone rang up talkback radio last night and mentioned her name. She is quite possibly the greatest ever female squash player in history. Only lost 2 matches in her career that spanned 20+ years. More amazing was that she had a 19 year stretch of being undefeated. Remarkable stuff.



  • The great paper caperYears of running drugs and boosting cars left Frank Bourassa thinking: There's got to be an easier way to earn a dishonest living. That's when he nerved up the idea to make his fortune. (Literally.) Which is how Frank became the most prolific counterfeiter in American history—a guy with more than $200 million in nearly flawless fake twenties stuffed in a garage. How he got away with it all, well, that's even crazier



  • Today I learned about Heather McKay. I'd never heard of her until someone rang up talkback radio last night and mentioned her name. She is quite possibly the greatest ever female squash player in history. Only lost 2 matches in her career that spanned 20+ years. More amazing was that she had a 19 year stretch of being undefeated. Remarkable stuff.

    It's a pity that her and Devoy's career didn't overlap - they might have had some mighty battles (or McKay might have just wiped the floor with her like she did everyone else, we'll never know).



  • I learnt about Dilworth School for the first time - never heard of it before, have you?
     
    Was watching a doco about Ulster people influencing NZ (John Ballance, Bill Massey ex PM's with Ulster roots).
     
    One bloke, James Dilworth made a ton of money years agao and set up a school for "boys in straitened circumstances" and it still operates today. Basically they admit boys from poverty stricken backgrounds and pay for everything at the school - boarding, classes, uniforms, food extra curricular etc. Sounds brilliant and all funded from the trust that Dilworth and his wife set up.
     
    On the doco they interviewed Angus Taa'avao (Naki and Blues prop) who is an old boy. Said he loved the place.
     
    On the website the first line in the admissions criteria section is "Dilworth is a school for making good boys better - it is not a school for boys presenting with behavioural challenges."
     
    Wonderful concept and still surviving in the modern day after over 100 years
     
    Is it common knowledge to know about this school?



  • I know about it but then I nearly went there. I didn't cotton to the overt religious overtones



  • The great paper caper

    http://longform.org/
     
    I subscribe to this, its a site that collects the best long articles on the web every week (this one was on there), from New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Wired, GQ etc.
     
    Has stuff like the articles that were turned into The Bling Ring, Into the Wild, 127 Hours. Its an awesome site to get articles to store away. I use it in conjunction with Pocket on my phone to store the articles for when I am astuck on a train or something.



  • Yep, I subscribe to its feed too (and use it with Pocket). In fact, it's where I got that article from. Great site. 🙂



  • I know about it but then I nearly went there. I didn't cotton to the overt religious overtones

    Ahh yes.The human paradox - that religious fervour and conviction so often results in utmost compassion through noble deeds simultaneously with war and bloodshed in equal manner



  • Ahh yes.The human paradox - that religious fervour and conviction so often results in utmost compassion through noble deeds simultaneously with war and bloodshed in equal manner
    Yeah but you must understand.......war is extremely profitable for those in power and using religion to fabricate an enemy is one of the tools of the trade. Successfull politics and religions are both based on creating fear and when the two converge......perfect storm. As with everyhting of this nature.....always follow the money trail.
    This article from Bill Bonner puts it in much better perspective. Ignore the reference to exact current events if you wish because the same principle applies universally. And to all governments.....not just the US. ( sorry its a bit long)
    War in the streets?
    Yesterday we were talking about the reaction to the murder in Ottawa of a Canadian soldier who was guarding a war memorial.
    There were 598 murders in Canada in 2011 (the most recent year we could find). As far as we know, not one registered the slightest interest in the US. But come a killer with Islam on his mind, and hardly a newspaper or talk show host in the 50 states can avoid comment.
    War in the streets of the West, was how the Wall Street Journal put it; the newspaper wants a more muscular approach to the Middle East.
    Why?
    After a quarter of a century...and trillions of dollars spent...and hundreds of thousands of lives lost...America appears to have more enemies in the Muslim world than ever before. Why would anyone want to continue on this barren path? To find out, we follow the money.
    Professor Michael Glennon of Tufts University asks the same question: Why such eagerness for war?
    People think that our government policies are determined by elected officials who carry out the nation's will, as expressed at the ballot box. That is not the way it works.
    Instead, it doesn't really matter much what voters want. They get some traction on the emotional and symbolic issues — gay marriage, minimum wage and so forth.
    But these issues don't really matter much to the elites. What policies do matter are those that they can use to shift wealth from the people who earned it to themselves.
    Autopilot
    Glennon, a former legal counsel to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has come to the same conclusion. He says he was curious as to why President Obama would end up with almost precisely the same foreign policies as President George W. Bush.
    ‘It hasn't been a conscious decision. [...] Members of Congress are generalists and need to defer to experts within the national security realm, as elsewhere.’
    They are particularly concerned about being caught out on a limb having made a wrong judgment about national security and tend, therefore, to defer to experts, who tend to exaggerate threats. The courts similarly tend to defer to the expertise of the network that defines national security policy.
    ‘The presidency is not a top-down institution, as many people in the public believe, headed by a president who gives orders and causes the bureaucracy to click its heels and salute. National security policy actually bubbles up from within the bureaucracy.
    ‘Many of the more controversial policies, from the mining of Nicaragua's harbors to the NSA surveillance program, originated within the bureaucracy. John Kerry was not exaggerating when he said that some of those programs are "on autopilot”.
    ‘These particular bureaucracies don't set truck widths or determine railroad freight rates. They make nerve-center security decisions that in a democracy can be irreversible, that can close down the marketplace of ideas, and can result in some very dire consequences.
    ‘I think the American people are deluded... They believe that when they vote for a president or member of Congress or succeed in bringing a case before the courts, that policy is going to change. Now, there are many counter-examples in which these branches do affect policy, as Bagehot predicted there would be. But the larger picture is still true – policy by and large in the national security realm is made by the concealed institutions.’
    Calling the Ottawa killing ‘war’ not only belittles the real thing; it misses the point. There is no war on the streets of North America. But there is plenty of fraud and cupidity.
    Here is how it works: The US security industry — the Pentagon, its hangers-on, its financiers and its suppliers — stomps around the Middle East, causing death and havoc in the Muslim world.
    ‘Terrorists’ naturally want to strike back at what they believe is the source of their sufferings: the US. Sooner or later, one of them is bound to make a go of it.
    The typical voter hasn't got time to analyse and understand the complex motives and confusing storyline behind the event. He sees only the evil deed.
    His blood runs hot for protection and retaliation. When the call goes up for more intervention and more security spending, he is behind it all the way.
    And now, people who've never missed a meal in their lives are calling for more war.
    Why?
    Regards,
    Bill Bonner



  • http://longform.org/
     
    I subscribe to this, its a site that collects the best long articles on the web every week (this one was on there), from New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Wired, GQ etc.
     
    Has stuff like the articles that were turned into The Bling Ring, Into the Wild, 127 Hours. Its an awesome site to get articles to store away. I use it in conjunction with Pocket on my phone to store the articles for when I am astuck on a train or something.

    Cheers, I've bookmarked that!



  • http://longform.org/
    I subscribe to this, its a site that collects the best long articles on the web every week (this one was on there), from New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Wired, GQ etc.
    Has stuff like the articles that were turned into The Bling Ring, Into the Wild, 127 Hours. Its an awesome site to get articles to store away. I use it in conjunction with Pocket on my phone to store the articles for when I am astuck on a train or something.

    Cheers for that, I think you posted it before but it must have not migrated from my old computer a couple of years ago. I hope my family don't plan on trying to converse with me this weekend , I have reading to catch up on.



  • I learned how to get around paywalls today.



  • I learned you can never truly please a woman. I learn this every day but somehow every night I seem to forget.



  • Over the weekend I learned how to technically surf the net from a different country.



  • I've learnt of a new resource for stirring next time some idiot starts yelling SHEEPLE at you for generally believing scientists and members of the medical profession: http://jameskennedymonash.wordpress.com/category/infographics/all-natural-banana-and-other-fruits/
     
    Exhibit A:

    Exhibit B:

    Exhibit 😄



  • Something I'd like to learn: what does this grey area on google maps represent in the UK? There are a couple of them, and I can't find a description of it when I zoom in.
     
    http://www.google.com.au/maps/@51.4056812,-1.0293918,10z



  • Shigella (bacillary dysentery, the primary diarrhoeal disease of World War 1), isolated from a British soldier who died from it in 1915, was found to be resistant to penicillin and erythromycin despite pre-dating their discovery by man.
     
    http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(14)61789-X/fulltext
     



  • Something I'd like to learn: what does this grey area on google maps represent in the UK? There are a couple of them, and I can't find a description of it when I zoom in.
     
    http://www.google.com.au/maps/@51.4056812,-1.0293918,10z

    The area west of Reading has RAF Welford in it so that may be why.
     
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Welford
     
    I've no idea what is going on with the area north of Skipton. As far as I know that's the Yorkshire Dales and shedloads of people traipse all over it enduring the bleak, bitter cold enjoying the fine landscape.





  • The voice actor who played Uncle Scrooge in Duck Tales (and still does the voice for video games etc) was Wilbur Post (the owner) in Mr Ed.
     
    The voice actor who plays Fred Jones in Scooby Doo is still the original voice actor from the 1960s.
     
    Voice actor June Foray, best known for Granny-style voices (e.g. Tweety and Sylvester, Grammy Gummi) won an Emmy in 2012 at the age of 94 - the oldest nominee and winner.
     
    The time gap between Stegosaurus and Tyrannosaurus Rex is more than the time gap between T. Rex and us.



  • The testes of male mouse lemurs swell 5-10 times larger during the breeding season.http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/females-protect-offspring-from-infanticide-by-forcing-males-to-compete-through-sperm-instead-of

    I know how they feel



  • it hurts alot when you hit your thumb with a hammer, and then almost as much again when you have to jam a needle through the nail to relieve the pressure...
     
    I learnt this last year when putting up a shed, I dont however believe I learnt a lesson, nor this time as I suspect I might do it again one day!



  • Arnold Schwarzenegger classic The Running Man was directed by Paul Michael Glaser, aka David Starsky.



  • If you place a rubber sheet on a mattress, cover it in icing sugar, then put a normal sheet on top of it, most people won't notice. As their body heat kicks in over night, the icing sugar wicks through the sheet, and they end up waking up glazed...



  • Also nixed for season one: the Vietnam war allegory "The Omega Glory," which Roddenberry considered a brilliant script and which he did manage to film in season two. (Roddenberry kept trying to get the network to promote "The Omega Glory" for Emmy consideration, to no avail.)



  • Human's aren't that much faster now than they were back in the day!
     
    I was listening to a TED podcast and they were discussing 100m runners and Jesse Owens and Bolt. 
     
    They started by saying how Bolt would finish 14 yards before Owens going by their 100m winning times. Which sounds like a big gap. They then did 3 beeps of how far about apart they would finish, with a 2nd place as the 3rd beep IIRC. Then they went on to explain that Owens would likely have come in at the 2nd beep (which was right after the first) if he had access to a modern running track and starting blocks as opposed to what he had to run on and the dug into the grass blocks he started with. 
     
    I wonder how quick Owens would be with modern diets, training etc.



  • Owens was running on ashes! that was a great TED talk. The swimming speed records alongside new suit technology was awesome. Clear relationship between technology and swimming faster... like dope in cycling



  • Owens was running on ashes! that was a great TED talk. The swimming speed records alongside new suit technology was awesome. Clear relationship between technology and swimming faster... like dope in cycling

    I was listening to the TED Radio Hour podcast which has snippets of talks and interviews with the speaker's and groups similar topics so didn't hear the swimming discussion. I'll have to listen to the talk now.



  • I read something along these lines on the internets one day:
     
    Purple is regarded as a regal colour because it would take 10,000 oysters to create a single senator’s robe.
    Conversely, carrots, which were originally purple, were bred to be orange as a delicacy for the Dutch royalty as they were known as the House of Orange.
     
    So why didn’t the Romans just use carrots in the first place?
     
    Don't hold me to it.



  • Today I've been learning about cotton bedsheets. What I learned (perhaps not perfectly)....

    1. Cotton. There are basically three varieties of cotton - American Upland, Pima (or Supima), and Egyptian. American Upland is generally a shorter staple cotton (i.e. short fibres in the same way that softwood radiata pine has short fibres making its pulp good for producing newsprint). If you pick up some twenty buck cotton sheets from the warehouse you'll be getting American Upland cotton. Pima is a fine, long staple cotton (like a hardwood eucalyptus used to make fine grade papers). Egyptian cotton is the longest and finest staple. There's nothing wrong with the first two. Pima's real,real good shit. But, Egyptian cotton is a fucking madman. When you slip between those sheets you'll know where that extra money went.
    2. Thread count. That's the number of threads woven per square inch (warp and weft). The more threads per square inch, the softer the fabric will be - seemingly to a point. My research suggests that the maximum number of single-ply threads that can be woven into a square inch is 500-600. But, extra threads can be woven into the weft (they're called "picks"). Picks will increase the thread count into the thousands and increase the weight and density of the fabric, but not the overall quality of the fabric.
    3. Weave. Seems like there's three types of weave used in sheets. Oxford (which some of you will know from Oxford cotton shirts - heavy, soft and hard wearing). But for sheets, more usually, the weaves are Percale or Sateen. Percale is a plain weave where the threads cross over one-another under and over to produce a fine and more durable finish. Sateen is a satin weave in which warp threads are interlaced with filling threads to create a more lustrous feel.
    4. Origin. Italy is apparently the home of the most top-notch sheets. If not going Italian then other European is the next best.
       
      Conclusion. Wait to buy your sheets until the New Year's half price sales. Then storm into the higher end sheets and pick up a set of 600 thread Egyptian cotton sateen sheets (a reasonable double-queen-king set fitting this description (but made in China) probably retails for $250-300 - grab it at $125-150) and you'll never go back (though maybe leave the hyper-expensive Italian ones for the bucket list).


  • That is ridiculously helpful!  I have always wondered the materiality of the thread count. That all makes sense now.
     
    I'll let true-love know next time as she is into this type of thing


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