Dry aged beef



  • Is there a good restaurant to get eat dry aged beef in Auckland?



  • I never like to see a thread with no replies.

    So. Sorry I don't know.



  • Someone's been inspired by the breef jerky eh.



  • @Tim said in Dry aged beef:

    Is there a good restaurant to get eat dry aged beef in Auckland?

    The Grill or Jervois steak house



  • @canefan Thanks dude.



  • @Tim said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan Thanks dude.

    I'd choose the Grill personally. In the casino precinct



  • https://concreteplayground.com/auckland/food-drink/food-2/the-seven-best-steak-houses-in-auckland

    I'd go the Grill as well. Sizzling Chorizo is a cheap and cheerful option. There's a Colombian alternative in Takapuna El Humero

    Digression - anyone tried Cazador in Mt Eden - specialises in wild game?



  • Just off the plane in Auckland, now waiting at the Regional gate for my transfer to Palmy (no need for any commentary about Palmy being relegated from Domestic to Regional status).

    Great to open the Fern to see this thread at the top of the Recent topic list, ahead of the Vege/Vegan thread.



  • @voodoo said in Dry aged beef:

    Just off the plane in Auckland, now waiting at the Regional gate for my transfer to Palmy (no need for any commentary about Palmy being relegated from Domestic to Regional status).

    Great to open the Fern to see this thread at the top of the Recent topic list, ahead of the Vege/Vegan thread.

    @Nepia swears there is somewhere good to eat in Palmy if that's any help 😉

    I think the only dry aged beef you'll get is if you search the supermarket fridge for a broken packet of mince.



  • I'm sure there will be no shortage of mature cows for @Voodoo in Palmy



  • @Tim Personally, I think the best place for a steak in Auckland is the Oyster and Chop in the viaduct. Nice seating with views and the selection really is incredible. Had the best T-bone there (you pay by the 100grams)

    Also did the Tomahawk plank for two. It was for one that night...… 🙂

    www.oysterandchop.co.nz

    They also have the 'add surf and turf' to their steaks with Crayfish or Tiger Prawns.

    The fun!! It never stops!!!!



  • @dogmeat said in Dry aged beef:

    https://concreteplayground.com/auckland/food-drink/food-2/the-seven-best-steak-houses-in-auckland

    I'd go the Grill as well. Sizzling Chorizo is a cheap and cheerful option. There's a Colombian alternative in Takapuna El Humero

    Digression - anyone tried Cazador in Mt Eden - specialises in wild game?

    I went a couple of years ago and it was good.



  • @Hooroo I've not been there. Is it near Botswana Butchery? I was disappointed when I went there but that was a couple of years ago



  • @Hooroo I reckon t-bones are massively underrated as a cut. Gimme one any day over some over-marbled, over-massaged, over-priced, (likely) small portion of something fancier



  • @voodoo my favorite cut to bbq is the tomohawk chop. Can't beat ribeye or sirloin for marbling



  • @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo I've not been there. Is it near Botswana Butchery? I was disappointed when I went there but that was a couple of years ago

    No, I don't think it is. It kind is on the opposite side of the water from the KZ7 or whatever that yacht is.



  • @voodoo said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo I reckon t-bones are massively underrated as a cut. Gimme one any day over some over-marbled, over-massaged, over-priced, (likely) small portion of something fancier

    I agree mate. My favourite thing at the moment is thick cut T's reverse seared. I have been doing that recently and buying really big ones so that it feeds us for two nights. First night traditionally and second night as a beef salad



  • @voodoo Oyster and Chop is on the far side of the Viaduct next to the Sebel. It's biggish so you can't miss it.

    I agree it's a nice place - good wine list but IMO a smidge below The Grill.

    Can't agree about a T Bone - it's effectively two different steaks - shortloin and tenderloin that need different cooking connected by a bone - so you are going to ruin one of the components - Each to their own I guess philistines



  • @dogmeat if you want bone in, tomohawk is the way to go



  • @dogmeat said in Dry aged beef:

    @voodoo Oyster and Chop is on the far side of the Viaduct next to the Sebel. It's biggish so you can't miss it.

    I agree it's a nice place - good wine list but IMO a smidge below The Grill.

    Can't agree about a T Bone - it's effectively two different steaks - shortloin and tenderloin that need different cooking connected by a bone - so you are going to ruin one of the components - Each to their own I guess philistines

    I disagree with your disagreement! 🙂 A really good cook can cope with this. Particularly if you reverse sear.

    At the thick end, is that the equivalent of Eye Fillet on one side and Porterhouse/Sirloin? I'm just not as familiar with those names.



  • @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @dogmeat if you want bone in, tomohawk is the way to go

    The thing with Tomahawk is that it is usually trimmed, I prefer the whole thing untrimmed. That makes it great. Pretty much the biggest rip-off steak you can get too, paying for a massive bone, even compared to T-Bone



  • @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @dogmeat said in Dry aged beef:

    @voodoo Oyster and Chop is on the far side of the Viaduct next to the Sebel. It's biggish so you can't miss it.

    I agree it's a nice place - good wine list but IMO a smidge below The Grill.

    Can't agree about a T Bone - it's effectively two different steaks - shortloin and tenderloin that need different cooking connected by a bone - so you are going to ruin one of the components - Each to their own I guess philistines

    I disagree with your disagreement! 🙂 A really good cook can cope with this. Particularly if you reverse sear.

    At the thick end, is that the equivalent of Eye Fillet on one side and Porterhouse/Sirloin? I'm just not as familiar with those names.

    Depends on what the butcher calls it really. So many different interpretations of Sirloin, Porterhouse, T-bone etc. Some (usually US) butchers have a fairly strict definition of the ratio of the two muscles while others will hack up the whole back end and have wildly varying steaks.
    Others will call one end of the sirloin, sirloin and the other end porterhouse (there are differences along the muscle, particularly in muscle grain.
    End of the day, know what it is that you like and buy according to sight not name.



  • @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @dogmeat if you want bone in, tomohawk is the way to go

    The thing with Tomahawk is that it is usually trimmed, I prefer the whole thing untrimmed. That makes it great. Pretty much the biggest rip-off steak you can get too, paying for a massive bone, even compared to T-Bone

    The bone is definitely for showing off. For everyday use I like sirloin the best because of the nice fat marbling



  • @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @dogmeat if you want bone in, tomohawk is the way to go

    The thing with Tomahawk is that it is usually trimmed, I prefer the whole thing untrimmed. That makes it great. Pretty much the biggest rip-off steak you can get too, paying for a massive bone, even compared to T-Bone

    The bone is definitely for showing off. For everyday use I like sirloin the best because of the nice fat marbling

    https://steakschool.com/learn/porterhouse-steak-australia-vs-europe/

    might change your mind about the bone



  • @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @dogmeat if you want bone in, tomohawk is the way to go

    The thing with Tomahawk is that it is usually trimmed, I prefer the whole thing untrimmed. That makes it great. Pretty much the biggest rip-off steak you can get too, paying for a massive bone, even compared to T-Bone

    The bone is definitely for showing off. For everyday use I like sirloin the best because of the nice fat marbling

    My favourite is definitely Pichana/Rump Cap(?)



  • @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @dogmeat if you want bone in, tomohawk is the way to go

    The thing with Tomahawk is that it is usually trimmed, I prefer the whole thing untrimmed. That makes it great. Pretty much the biggest rip-off steak you can get too, paying for a massive bone, even compared to T-Bone

    The bone is definitely for showing off. For everyday use I like sirloin the best because of the nice fat marbling

    My favourite is definitely Pichana/Rump Cap(?)

    I love that too. It's all good, about the only steak cut I rarely eat is eye fillet.

    Regarding the bone issue, meathead provides a counter argument

    https://amazingribs.com/technique-and-science/myths/bones-make-meat-better





  • @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @dogmeat if you want bone in, tomohawk is the way to go

    The thing with Tomahawk is that it is usually trimmed, I prefer the whole thing untrimmed. That makes it great. Pretty much the biggest rip-off steak you can get too, paying for a massive bone, even compared to T-Bone

    The bone is definitely for showing off. For everyday use I like sirloin the best because of the nice fat marbling

    My favourite is definitely Pichana/Rump Cap(?)

    I love that too. It's all good, about the only steak cut I rarely eat is eye fillet.

    Same here. I will happily eat rump before Eye fillet. In fact I like buying slabs of rump.



  • UK sirloin = US striploin

    US porterhouse = T-bone with a large enough tenderloin side

    Rump end of the sirloin is wide but has a line of sinew and a less desirable muscle (Gluteus medius, aka heart of rump) on the fat cap side.



  • @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @dogmeat if you want bone in, tomohawk is the way to go

    The thing with Tomahawk is that it is usually trimmed, I prefer the whole thing untrimmed. That makes it great. Pretty much the biggest rip-off steak you can get too, paying for a massive bone, even compared to T-Bone

    The bone is definitely for showing off. For everyday use I like sirloin the best because of the nice fat marbling

    My favourite is definitely Pichana/Rump Cap(?)

    I love that too. It's all good, about the only steak cut I rarely eat is eye fillet.

    Regarding the bone issue, meathead provides a counter argument

    https://amazingribs.com/technique-and-science/myths/bones-make-meat-better

    Good article although I'm not entirely sure what the premise is that he is trying to disprove. It is fairly obvious without all the explanation that under certain cooking styles bone in/out will have little difference. Under other methods though you will add something to your eating enjoyment leaving the bone in.
    Plenty of different cooking methods (and cuts) around the world leave the bone in for a reason. If you are only thinking reverse sear or grill then you aren't exploring other methods in the argument.
    Take that Basque method in the video above. Thick cut, heavily marbled and cooked long high up over coals. By the time a crust has formed, I would say that both the marbling and a good portion of the connective tissue to the bone has melted somewhat. Take the bone off and you will, or should, remove the connecting tissue as it will contract and pull the steak tight. You have removed something that (cooked well) adds flavour.



  • @Crucial said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Hooroo said in Dry aged beef:

    @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @dogmeat if you want bone in, tomohawk is the way to go

    The thing with Tomahawk is that it is usually trimmed, I prefer the whole thing untrimmed. That makes it great. Pretty much the biggest rip-off steak you can get too, paying for a massive bone, even compared to T-Bone

    The bone is definitely for showing off. For everyday use I like sirloin the best because of the nice fat marbling

    My favourite is definitely Pichana/Rump Cap(?)

    I love that too. It's all good, about the only steak cut I rarely eat is eye fillet.

    Regarding the bone issue, meathead provides a counter argument

    https://amazingribs.com/technique-and-science/myths/bones-make-meat-better

    Good article although I'm not entirely sure what the premise is that he is trying to disprove. It is fairly obvious without all the explanation that under certain cooking styles bone in/out will have little difference. Under other methods though you will add something to your eating enjoyment leaving the bone in.
    Plenty of different cooking methods (and cuts) around the world leave the bone in for a reason. If you are only thinking reverse sear or grill then you aren't exploring other methods in the argument.
    Take that Basque method in the video above. Thick cut, heavily marbled and cooked long high up over coals. By the time a crust has formed, I would say that both the marbling and a good portion of the connective tissue to the bone has melted somewhat. Take the bone off and you will, or should, remove the connecting tissue as it will contract and pull the steak tight. You have removed something that (cooked well) adds flavour.

    Gutted I have chicken for lunch while I know there is sliced tomahawk in the fridge back home.



  • @Tim said in Dry aged beef:

    UK sirloin = US striploin

    US porterhouse = T-bone with a large enough tenderloin side

    Rump end of the sirloin is wide but has a line of sinew and a less desirable muscle on the fat cap side.

    UK butchery should be banned. No respect for the musculature IMO. It is portioning more than anything.

    US butchery looks to have taken the standard UK cuts and treated them in a European manner. More thought put into cooking and taste.
    Give me French butchery in general though. Respect to the carcass.



  • @Crucial Yeah, a lot of the "new" cuts are old cuts in french butchery.



  • @Crucial that dude cooking the steaks is famous. I saw him on another show. They use 7 or 8 year old dairy cattle because it gives outstanding marbling



  • @Crucial a mate buys whole rumps and breaks them down into individual muscles. Swears the steaks he gets are amazing



  • @Tim said in Dry aged beef:

    @Crucial Yeah, a lot of the "new" cuts are old cuts in french butchery.

    Give me a good Bavette or Onglet and I'm happy.



  • @Crucial Do love an onglet. In NZ they are technically offal. 😞



  • @canefan said in Dry aged beef:

    @Crucial a mate buys whole rumps and breaks them down into individual muscles. Swears the steaks he gets are amazing

    That's because all the muscles in a rump are different textures and need treating differently. He can then cook each they way he likes without compromising.

    It's a bit like Denvering a venison leg.
    Take a leg of venison and chop it up and it is only good for long stewing. Take a leg of venison and break down each muscle separately, removing all sinew and silver skin and you get nice lean steaks.
    When I had a restaurant I saved money by buying whole legs and doing them myself. The cost of buying pre 'denvered' venison took the profit out of the plate.



  • @Tim said in Dry aged beef:

    @Crucial Do love an onglet. In NZ they are technically offal. 😞

    Dumb butchers and supermarkets throw them into sausages and patties.



  • @Crucial Yeah, you have to get the butcher to specially separate them from a whole side of beef if you want one.


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