Cyber Attack



  • Don't know too much about it apart from the attackers were asking for $300US to release PC's

    Does this affect Macs at this stage? If not, how come?



  • I haven't looked into it in too much detail, but I believe the targeted PCs were running older (less secure) versions of Windows.

    As for why not Macs? Too small a segment of the PC market to bother targeting (less than 10%).

    The best way to protect yourself against ransomware is to have regular backups (look into automated cloud backups), then you can just revert to before you were infected and pay the scum nothing.



  • Noice! Thanks for that



  • Question.

    Several items and articles I've read or watched on this have talked about ways to protect yourself and mentioned not opening anything emailed to you by people you don't know.

    But, they don't mention clicking on potentially dodgy internet links - not just porno shit, but some of those sites that stuff links to like "Which toy did Santa deliver most the year you were born" or all sorts of quizzes and advertisements that appear on your Facebook newsfeed.

    Is it less likely you're going to pick up malware or viruses from clicking on the "wrong" link or is it just so impossible to protect yourself from clicking on the wrong link that it's not worth warning about?



  • One of the best ways to avoid dodgy links (from webpages, not emails) is to use an ad blocker like ublock origin.



  • @Kirwan said in Cyber Attack:

    I haven't looked into it in too much detail, but I believe the targeted PCs were running older (less secure) versions of Windows.

    As for why not Macs? Too small a segment of the PC market to bother targeting (less than 10%).

    The best way to protect yourself against ransomware is to have regular backups (look into automated cloud backups), then you can just revert to before you were infected and pay the scum nothing.

    Have seen a few reports stating that paying them doesn't "unencrypt" shit anyway.



  • This is a similar program that's quite disturbing,

    http://www.wired.co.uk/article/adult-player-android-porn-ransomware



  • @jegga Would be a funny array of photos I bet



  • @NTA paying them gets your info back, but they are still 'in' your system, to either hit you up for some more cash down the track, or more is the case, on-sell the info to someone else to hold you to ransom, so they win twice.

    The way they are working is essentially holding your info for an amount that isn't huge and is usually under an excess or the cost for cyber insurance, so people usually think ah I'll just pay it.

    Most employees in my company got an e-mail yesterday form a partner organization advising us to update windows to protect ourselves from the Ransomware...alas, their e-mail wasn't quite right, so was everyone was alerted to the fact it was part of the scam.



  • @jegga why the fuck would you download an app for Porn? that's fucking stupid.



  • @Kirwan said in Cyber Attack:

    I haven't looked into it in too much detail, but I believe the targeted PCs were running older (less secure) versions of Windows.

    As for why not Macs? Too small a segment of the PC market to bother targeting (less than 10%).

    The best way to protect yourself against ransomware is to have regular backups (look into automated cloud backups), then you can just revert to before you were infected and pay the scum nothing.

    Do you know which versions?



  • @mariner4life said in Cyber Attack:

    @jegga why the fuck would you download an app for Porn? that's fucking stupid.

    ( checks apps, breaths sigh of relief )

    Not sure why you would unless they promised something like passwords to pay sites or similar.
    Avoiding The shame of everyone you know seeing your o face while you fap to your preferred variety of porn means it's probably quite lucrative.



  • @Chris-B. said in Cyber Attack:

    Question.

    Several items and articles I've read or watched on this have talked about ways to protect yourself and mentioned not opening anything emailed to you by people you don't know.

    But, they don't mention clicking on potentially dodgy internet links - not just porno shit, but some of those sites that stuff links to like "Which toy did Santa deliver most the year you were born" or all sorts of quizzes and advertisements that appear on your Facebook newsfeed.

    Is it less likely you're going to pick up malware or viruses from clicking on the "wrong" link or is it just so impossible to protect yourself from clicking on the wrong link that it's not worth warning about?

    That's a valid point, you'll generally find that dodgy links from websites will install adware - which basically installs advertising popups on your PC, and can collect information about what you're doing. Can be very annoying.

    Best way to stay out of trouble is to download and install all updates as they become available (especially for Windows), and be careful what you click on. As @Kirwan said regular backups can be a life-saver too, not just for hacks but a number of other problems that can occur as well.

    Remember that something like 80%+ hacks are 'user assisted' I.E. they are reliant on the end-user clicking on something to kick off the hack. Without that they cannot do anything, so it's important to be careful about what you click on.

    As an example, a common scam is the hackers will spoof an email to you that pretends to be from your bank. It will say something along the lines of you need to update some of your details, and will provide a link to do so. The link will take you to a login page that looks exactly like your banks, and when you enter your username/password you basically give those details to the hackers.



  • this is a copy of what we got yesterday, cloned to appear from one of our partners.

    0_1494901655726_Capture.PNG



  • As my brother put it; stop opening shit you weren't expecting. Stop visiting dodgy sites. Get remote backups for the other 0.001%