Honey Rant



  • Yes, you read correctly, a honey (short) rant. How the fuck is a pot of Honey worth $8????



  • Market Forces



  • @Kirwan said in Honey Rant:

    Yes, you read correctly, a honey (short) rant. How the fuck is a pot of Honey worth $8????

    Could be worse. It could be a shade over $1000 for 210g.

    https://nz.steenshoney.com/steens-raw-manuka-honey-umf-26-cold-pressed-manuka-honey-200g-nz143u

    Or, if you buy it in duty free, $888 - guess who that's being aimed at?



  • Liquid gold!

    And why the Aussies are tying to latch onto the 'manuka' name for their Honey.

    Is big business, and given the nature of it collection, plenty of people stealing hives from all over as well.



  • I think there's some "beliefs" that it has amazing healing properties or something which allows them to push up the price.

    Are bees in short supply? I hear people saying "save the bees" a fair bit these days.



  • Yeah, is this due to increased demand, (and/) or reduced supply (possibly due to bee disease etc)?



  • @No-Quarter said in Honey Rant:

    I think there's some "beliefs" that it has amazing healing properties or something which allows them to push up the price.

    Are bees in short supply? I hear people saying "save the bees" a fair bit these days.

    I went on a school trip to Comvita last year, bloody fascinating stuff. In short yes, bees are under serious threat.

    http://www.comvita.co.nz/store/experience

    I go out of my way to rescue bees now.



  • In a word. Yes, basically in Asia, it's viewed as having huge healing powers, so it's only going to go up up up.

    To be fair, a good mates wife had serious issues with recovery from an op a few years ago where there were issues with the healing and scarring process. The Dr suggested to try Manuka honey on the wound ... and things did start to heal properly after that.

    So I have actually seen in action. If I was a half decent investor, I'd have bought bought bought on this ...



  • To be fair it is a pretty amazing product. In its raw state it doesn't go off and tastes pretty nice too



  • @Baron-Silas-Greenback yeah everything we planted (trees, shrubs) on our property was all to do with attracting bees and birds.

    I rarely see wasps now too (cnuts) but a few of my little shrubs are literally humming with bees throughout the day, so busy with activity!

    I met with a guy a few months ago who is an Apiarist and he has thousands of hives from central North Island to the southern parts of Northland.

    Fascinating business!



  • Looking at getting into beekeeping myself, could watch them all day in the garden.

    I have a mate who is ex SAS.. he told me they were taught to source a pot of local honey whenever posted somewhere new (helps with immunity against local diseases etc he says)



  • The manuka honey I buy and use sparingly is over $20 per 500 g tub.

    Back in my student days at Waikato Uni I worked in the same lab as one of the pioneers of using manuka honey for medicinal purposes (e.g. wound healing).



  • @Baron-Silas-Greenback said in Honey Rant:

    @No-Quarter said in Honey Rant:

    I think there's some "beliefs" that it has amazing healing properties or something which allows them to push up the price.

    Are bees in short supply? I hear people saying "save the bees" a fair bit these days.

    I went on a school trip to Comvita last year, bloody fascinating stuff. In short yes, bees are under serious threat.

    http://www.comvita.co.nz/store/experience

    I go out of my way to rescue bees now.

    I planted some flowers in my garden and noticed a few bees buzzing in amongst them so I feel like I'm doing my bit.



  • @Hooroo said in Honey Rant:

    To be fair it is a pretty amazing product. In its raw state it doesn't go off and tastes pretty nice too

    Good for sealing wounds or something, too.



  • My youngest (4) has stepped and been stung by 2 bees in the past week or so, fuck em I hope they all die..

    Nah I actually love honey on my toast.



  • @Virgil said in Honey Rant:

    My youngest (4) has stepped and been stung by 2 bees in the past week or so, fuck em I hope they all die..

    Nah I actually love honey on my toast.

    If the bees die we are poke, who will pollenate all the trees plants veges etc?



  • @Virgil said in Honey Rant:

    My youngest (4) has stepped and been stung by 2 bees in the past week or so, fuck em I hope they all die..

    I know you are trying to be funny, but that is stupid.



  • my kids loved the Bee Movie



  • Plant lots of lavender! (Amongst other good options). Have put lots in under our dwarf citrus trees and it seems to be a good attraction/source of food for the bees (and handily gets them in the vicinity of the citrus...)

    When we first moved in our garden was full of yukkas etc... not a bee in sight for the first year...



  • the 'Cigar Plant' which comes in a range of colours/variations and sizes are brilliant for attracting bees! I have one that is about 1.2m tall and about 1.5m wide, apparently isn't supposed to get that big, but you hear the hive of activity of the bees is awesome. I also have a few smaller versions as well, equally as productive.

    alt text



  • They seem to love anything purple or blue.

    Tobacco plants are great to attract them too



  • Big fan of planting for insects and birds. Stoked to see some bees in our garden this summer. First time we've seen some at home in years. Hopefully a sign of a comeback.



  • @Baron-Silas-Greenback said in Honey Rant:

    @No-Quarter said in Honey Rant:

    I think there's some "beliefs" that it has amazing healing properties or something which allows them to push up the price.

    Are bees in short supply? I hear people saying "save the bees" a fair bit these days.

    I went on a school trip to Comvita last year, bloody fascinating stuff. In short yes, bees are under serious threat.

    http://www.comvita.co.nz/store/experience

    I go out of my way to rescue bees now.

    Is the bee threat thing a real thing? It's the first thing I thought when I saw the price.

    Disease ridden fuckers have moved me to jam on my toast. FFS.



  • @Baron-Silas-Greenback said in Honey Rant:

    @Virgil said in Honey Rant:

    My youngest (4) has stepped and been stung by 2 bees in the past week or so, fuck em I hope they all die..

    I know you are trying to be funny, but that is stupid.

    Obviously.

    Some of the farms near where live have several hives on them, there's the occasional post on our local fb page asking for help locating missing numbers of bees. Seems rustling? Bees has become a big thing



  • @MajorRage said in Honey Rant:

    In a word. Yes, basically in Asia, it's viewed as having huge healing powers, so it's only going to go up up up.
    To be fair, a good mates wife had serious issues with recovery from an op a few years ago where there were issues with the healing and scarring process. The Dr suggested to try Manuka honey on the wound ... and things did start to heal properly after that.

    Manuka honey has methylglyoxal, which has medically proven antibacterial properties. It's increasingly big here in Oz where they're trying to prevent New Zealand from lodging a claim to the name which would give New Zealand exclusivity. Just as wines can only use the name if they're from the specific region, e.g. Champagne/ methode champenoise.



  • @SammyC said in Honey Rant:

    Looking at getting into beekeeping myself, could watch them all day in the garden.

    I have a mate who is ex SAS.. he told me they were taught to source a pot of local honey whenever posted somewhere new (helps with immunity against local diseases etc he says)

    0_1488345545422_images.jpg



  • The industry is short of skilled workers... and it's hard in the short run to figure out how apiculture can be automated 🙂



  • I haven't seen Manuka over here for less than 15 squid. Crazy.



  • @Virgil stealing hives is a big thing sadly, as often they are on farms or in forestry away from homes with no security (nigh on impossible to insure hives bar for fire or storm damage, and then its only the hives, not the bees/honey)



  • @Donsteppa said in Honey Rant:

    Plant lots of lavender! (Amongst other good options). Have put lots in under our dwarf citrus trees and it seems to be a good attraction/source of food for the bees (and handily gets them in the vicinity of the citrus...)

    When we first moved in our garden was full of yukkas etc... not a bee in sight for the first year...

    Shouldn't you plant manuka and then live off the riches 😲



  • @dK said in Honey Rant:

    @Donsteppa said in Honey Rant:

    Plant lots of lavender! (Amongst other good options). Have put lots in under our dwarf citrus trees and it seems to be a good attraction/source of food for the bees (and handily gets them in the vicinity of the citrus...)

    When we first moved in our garden was full of yukkas etc... not a bee in sight for the first year...

    Shouldn't you plant manuka and then live off the riches 😲

    The dwarf citrus reference is a clue to how much land we don't have 🙂



  • @Donsteppa yeah I think you need a decent amount of a specific manuka too.



  • Bees love blue flowers.
    Always plant a few borage or lavender or cornflowers around your vege garden to get the bees in but not too many so they only feast on them but will also do your pollination (especially for cucubits). I have often had plenty of bees gorging themselves on borage and ignoring the courgette flowers that need pollinating from the male to female flowers.
    Comfrey is a great all purpose thing to have growing wild through your garden. The flowers attract the bees in for pollination as as soon as they get a bit big just rip the leaves off and throw them into a barrel of water (I used an old brew kit). It stinks like hell but makes brilliant liquid fertiliser.



  • http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/features/the-manuka-honey-scandal-9577344.html

    At the heart of the scandal: basic maths. According to New Zealand's leading manuka association, 1,800 tonnes a year of the honey are now consumed in the UK each year, out of an estimated 10,000 tonnes globally. Yet production of the genuine stuff is set at just 1,700 tonnes, or the equivalent to more than three million small jars. Unless Britain has somehow managed to secure all of it, there's a lot of fake manuka on our shelves.



  • @gollum said in Honey Rant:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/features/the-manuka-honey-scandal-9577344.html

    At the heart of the scandal: basic maths. According to New Zealand's leading manuka association, 1,800 tonnes a year of the honey are now consumed in the UK each year, out of an estimated 10,000 tonnes globally. Yet production of the genuine stuff is set at just 1,700 tonnes, or the equivalent to more than three million small jars. Unless Britain has somehow managed to secure all of it, there's a lot of fake manuka on our shelves.

    I remember reading that as well. I think it also comes down to the definition of 'genuine stuff' which is based on the UMF factor. I don't think it counts the household supermarket manuka honey which is still quite unique and tasty. The UMF is the medicinal factor.
    Isn't there a big problem up north with gangs and hives? Standover tactics and hive theft etc. I think beekeepers up that way have to be quite secretive as to where their hives are



  • @Crucial

    Same deal in Canada where organised crime started stealing maple syrup

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/maple-syrup-heist-quebec-canada-guilty-1.3848431

    A man described as one of the ringleaders in the 2012 theft of $18.7-million worth of maple syrup has been found guilty by a jury in Trois-Rivières, Que.

    The Great Maple Syrup Robbery made headlines around the world four years ago. The elaborate caper saw 3,000 tonnes of syrup go missing from a warehouse belonging to the Federation of Quebec Maple Syrup Producers — the regulatory body that controls and manages the syrup trade. The heist was only discovered when a routine inventory check in July 2012 turned up an empty barrel that was supposed to be full of syrup. Officials with the federation quickly realized that dozens of its barrels contained not the sweet stuff, but water.

    The resulting investigation by Quebec provincial police led to the arrests of 26 people. On Saturday, Richard Vallières was found guilty of theft, fraud and trafficking stolen goods. During his trial in Quebec Superior Court, he said that he had filled the barrels with water. But he also insisted that he hadn't wanted to. He testified that he was forced to buy syrup stolen from the federation, and replace it with water, by a man who carried a gun.

    Vallières said the man told him, "I know where you live." Vallières also said the man led him to believe he had links to the Mafia.



  • @Crucial yep there is differing grades of it, from the medicinal stuff down, as I said above, the Aussies are calling some of thier
    S Manuka too cos of the plant the bees are using is a type of manuka



  • @dK said in Honey Rant:

    @Donsteppa said in Honey Rant:

    Plant lots of lavender! (Amongst other good options). Have put lots in under our dwarf citrus trees and it seems to be a good attraction/source of food for the bees (and handily gets them in the vicinity of the citrus...)

    When we first moved in our garden was full of yukkas etc... not a bee in sight for the first year...

    Shouldn't you plant manuka and then live off the riches 😲

    Remember the 70s and 80s where "scrub cutting" was a massive industry and consisted of stripping the hillsides of manuka?



  • @booboo said in Honey Rant:

    @dK said in Honey Rant:

    @Donsteppa said in Honey Rant:

    Plant lots of lavender! (Amongst other good options). Have put lots in under our dwarf citrus trees and it seems to be a good attraction/source of food for the bees (and handily gets them in the vicinity of the citrus...)

    When we first moved in our garden was full of yukkas etc... not a bee in sight for the first year...

    Shouldn't you plant manuka and then live off the riches 😲

    Remember the 70s and 80s where "scrub cutting" was a massive industry and consisted of stripping the hillsides of manuka?

    May have participated a little scrub cutting on the uncles farm. Fuck the bees



  • So with honey being liquid gold now does this mean that capitalism might yet save the bee..and consequently all of human civilisation (apparently according to a book I've heard about)


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